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I wonder if anybody has or knows about a (digital or paper) copy of the single-issue German language magazine "Computern mit Kindern" (Computing with Children), published in Germany in late 1984 (probably October) as a joint special issue ("Sonderheft") of the three monthly magazines "Eltern" (Parents, still existing), "PM Magazin" (a fairly good popular science magazine at that time, unfortunately it went pseudoscience a few years later) and "PM Computerheft" (PM Computer Magazine). Among other articles, it contained a (maybe?) historically interesting market overview of currently available home computers from that time period. (Also it was the very first computer magazine I ever owned...) Unfortunately I have lost my copy during a move. Google seems to have only one mention of it, as source of a quotation in a slightly later article for teachers.

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I have a small collection of YPS comic books (also published by Gruner+Jahr) and some recollection of what you're looking for.

And sure enough YPS #473, which according to this database came out in November 1984, features this full page ad for "Computern mit Kindern".

Computern mit Kindern

So not really an answer to your question, but just to provide an image and to confirm the time frame.

Edit: Found an ad for the above mentioned P. M. Computerheft.

pm computerheft ad

YPS #510 from July 1985.

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  • 1
    Thanks, this is the one I mean. Maybe I also learned about it from YPS, I was certainly a regular reader at that time.
    – TeaRex
    Aug 23 at 8:37
  • Why "Computern" and not "Computer", the ordinary plural form?
    – OmarL
    Aug 23 at 10:15
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    @OmarL Computer used as a verb here. Loosely translates to coding is great. At least that's what the kangaroo says...
    – Uli
    Aug 23 at 12:17
  • 2
    @OmarL Uli is right. "Computern" is not a standard German word, but an informal verbization that is used as gerund. The most direct translation, using an informal English word as well would be "computering". Aug 24 at 7:26
  • 2
    @OmarL It's a denominal verb, a noun turned into a verb. English uses a variant of afixes (or none) depending on purpose. In German it's always a suffix depending on the wordending to be converted (plus some umlaut forming) with -en or -n as generic case. So 'computern' is essentially the same as 'compute' in English, so the title would be 'How to compute with children' or 'How to use Computer with children' ('computing' would be transitive which this is not). And no, it's neither slang nor informal, it's simply derivative from a new word (Computer) following the basic rules of German gramer.
    – Raffzahn
    Aug 24 at 11:32
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Looking at the picture in the answer by Uli, this does not appear to be a single-issue magazine, but it is a special issue as part of the magazine called "Eltern". All German periodicals should have an archive copy in the German National Library. As far as copyright permits it, you should be able to get a copy of a single article from the national library, which will require a fee for shipping and handling. I assume they won't send out copies or scans of the full magazine.

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    One could also try contacting Eltern directly. Publishers typically keep a full archive of what they've published. The caveats that Michael mentioned would likewise apply. Aug 24 at 10:09
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Take a look of these cover pages https://www.kultboy.com/index.php?site=kult/kultmags&id=63

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