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I once had a PC with an LCD monitor and I'd like to remember what model that monitor was. Here's what I remember:

  • It was basically a beige rectangular box with right angles on all corners. Only the bottom edge was like a cylinder that allowed to tilt the screen up and down. The screen itself was maybe 6" in size.
  • It was black and white (or rather the usual monochrome LCD colors).
  • I have only ever seen text on it, I don't know if it had a graphics mode.
  • It didn't use a 15-pin Sub-D VGA connector. I think it used a 9-pin Sub-D like a modem. I don't remember the gender though.
  • Therefore it needed a special graphics card (not PCI, maybe ISA), but I don't know if that card was specific to the monitor or just an older generic graphics card.
  • The PC was x86 architecture, probably 386 or newer, but that doesn't mean they were sold together.
  • It was used in Germany some time between 1980 and 2005.

Drawing

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  • Mind to add country and time - maybe as well where the PC was used (school, home, business).
    – Raffzahn
    Oct 28, 2021 at 16:51
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    9-pin suggests it's a TTL monitor, Hercules or CGA-compatible. Oct 28, 2021 at 17:41
  • @Raffzahn Country is Germany. The machine was one of many that somehow ended up in my basement, that puts time at anything between 1980 and 2005.
    – AndreKR
    Oct 28, 2021 at 17:55
  • @AndreKR Please add this and whatever else there is to the question text. Also, was ist scrapped when it ended up in you hands? Where did it come from? What was it originally used for? When did it arrive? What was the machine like? Add whatever may help to pin down the circumstances. After all, squarish B&W on a tiltable stand isn't exactly a rare feature for LCD :)) (We can at least be sure that 1980 is rather early for an LCD even more so for something PC compatible :))
    – Raffzahn
    Oct 28, 2021 at 18:05
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    @MauryMarkowitz Check out my drawing in the comment before yours, does that clear things up?
    – AndreKR
    Oct 29, 2021 at 20:49

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