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Where could I find a list of all of the microchips released by Intel, including microprocessors, Rams, roms, storage devices. Etc.

I have checked Wikipedia, and they have the processors, but not any of the RAM, ROM, or other chips.

I found the collectors guide to vintage Intel microchips But that only covers 1969 to 1975. And in 1995 their website launched. So I need the time period from 1975-1995.

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    Even if such a resource existed, there is no guarantee it'll be around for longer than an internet moment. Hard to see this as on-topic for Retro.SE. – user12 Nov 20 '18 at 21:39
  • yeah, sorry i dont really know where to put this. i was turned away from superuser, and history doesn't cover computers. its a difficult question. – Shadow Nov 20 '18 at 21:54
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    I guess these sorts of queries aren't always a good fit for the SE model. Like I said, even if such a thing existed, the information is destined to be out of date in no time. – user12 Nov 20 '18 at 21:57
  • i know, i want it for older models. if i want to find out newer chips i just need to go to their website under the web archive. its before the internet that i need. – Shadow Nov 20 '18 at 21:58
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Where could I find a list of all of the microchips released by Intel, including microprocessors, Rams, roms, storage devices. Etc.

Oh, that's a simple one: Get the Databooks

Intel, like any other manufacturer, has a good history of publishing big volumes of databooks and even more datasheets. At least all basic chips that ever made it into production (and many that didn't) are listed there. This only excludes special customer versions and developments - but usually these are 'only' variations of otherwise available ones.

Beside having them on shelf (*1), there's always Bitsavers Component Archive. In the case of Intel they offer next to all databooks between 1975 and 1996. Download and enjoy :))


*1 - Seriously, there is almost nothing as satisfying as a whole wall covered with databooks :))

  • Thank you so much. That's exactly what I was looking for. – Shadow Nov 20 '18 at 22:22
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    Oh, and it's got basically every chip manufacterers databooks as well. I'm giddy :) Thank you so much. – Shadow Nov 20 '18 at 22:26
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    Bitsavers (and it's mirrors) is one of the greatest sites as all. Unlike Archive.Org, no bells and whistles, just the plain PDF. Always my first stop for hard information. I mean, serious, a site offering information about the Cogar System 4 ... heaven :)) – Raffzahn Nov 20 '18 at 22:42
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    Another useful thing that Bitsavers has, if you're looking for a component but don't know who would have manufactured it, are the books that collected data from multiple manufacturers and organized and indexed them by category rather than manufacturer, e.g. IC Master. So if you wanted to know, say, what the fastest memory you could buy in 1984 was, you can just download that year's book and scan the memory index to find the best option. – Jules Nov 21 '18 at 4:56
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    "There is almost nothing as satisfying as a whole wall covered with databooks" +1 – DrSheldon Nov 22 '18 at 3:19

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