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I'm wondering how many computers were based on the MC88100 and MC88110 processors that were released commercially.

As of now, i've found the MVMe boards and Luna88K(+) computers exist, but that's about it, and am curious what other machines based on these processors exist.

  • Hello, and welcome to Retrocomputing! Your question might be more broadly useful if you asked for examples of commercial processors, instead of asking "how many". – cmm Mar 7 at 21:37
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I'm wondering how many computers were based on the MC88100 and MC88110 processors that were released commercially.

Quite some.

While many systems were based on Motorola's VME boards NVME187 (single CPU) and NVME188 (dual CPU) and thereof a lot of them were made by Motorola (like the Delta 8000 series) or using all Motorola components (like the standard VME System 900 housings), there were also dedicated designs not based on these boards. For example the Motorola 8120, a square box design, somewhat similar to a lower profile Apple Mac IIci/cx box.

As of now, I've found the MVMe boards and Luna88K(+) computers exist, but that's about it, and am curious what other machines based on these processors exist.

Beside Motorola's own systems (Delta 8000 and 8120) there were the

  • BBN TC2000 systems, kind of an early massive parallel RISC system with up to 128 CPUs.

  • Data General m88k AViiON family, covering everything from pizza box desktop machines (AV300) over bulky servers (AV4000) to rack sized servers (AV9000).

  • Triton Dolphin systems (never seen one)

  • Omron Luna 88k workstations (click the links for pictures) mostly sold in Japan

  • Encore 91/93 systems - kind of mini-rack systems on wheels.

Heck, even Next worked on an 88k based prototype.

Also, NCD as well as Tektronix did build several 88k based X-terminals

Not many 88k based computers actually exist as far as I know, maybe a dozen or two at most, but they are so obscure I basically cannot find anything about them.

I'd add several trailing zeros here. Data General alone built more than 30 or so different models based on their 88k boards. They alone are good for more than 50k unit sales. Encore also made good sales, similarly everything based on Motorola's boards, not to mention the rather large number of NCR and Tektronix terminals. Just because a CPU and its computers were not much used on everybody's desktop installations doesn't make them tiny in sales.

  • Good point, will edit that last line :) – moonheart08 Mar 7 at 23:23

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