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2

Assuming you're looking to put your laptop on the internet as opposed to just do file transfers or some such, there are a couple of DOS TCP/IP stacks. If you're lucky, you can find one of the Xircom PIO ethernet controllers. More likely, you'll do it over the serial port. You're looking for an IP stack that supports SLIP or PPP, which are IP-over-serial ...


3

One option is to use a modern Linux board to act as a fake modem connected to serial port. Then you can use any old software that would connect to internet by a modem connection, without actually having to pay the massive phone bills of the 1990s. The software setup is not very complex, mainly requiring installing ppp server on Linux. There is also a ...


10

If you have another computer to hook it up to and act as a bridge (or router), you could in principle run SLIP or PPP over the serial port to another machine. You're unlikely to get speeds exceeding 100 kb/s.


13

Yes. For example, the Xircom PE3-10BT is a parallel port adapter that allows an RJ45 connector be plugged into it. You don't get full 10 Mbps with it, but it works. Mine is powered via a PS/2 port passthrough plug and jack. I use mine with my 386 laptop.


10

Since it's a pretty early laptop without a PCMCIA port, there won't be a way to add an Ethernet port. Your best approach is to use the serial port to connect via null-modem cable to a modern machine that either has an RS-232 serial port, or has hardware and drivers for bridging its USB port to RS-232 serial. Once the two are connected, use of the laptop as a ...


6

To add to Raffzahn's answer: I strengthen the "might not be compatible to 16-bit cards" to "are most likely not compatible to 16-bit cards". As I see the traces on the photo, there is nothing that supports the impression these slots are ISA 16-bit compatible - but also no proof they are not. A reliable tool to learn more about that board is a continuity ...


19

I found this page on the motherboard, which says they are some sort of "32-bit external memory card." What are these slots? They are exactly that, memory expansion. This is a rather early 386 board from before memory modules became a thing. The mainboard can be fitted with 1 MiB using 256 KiBit chips (41256), so any expansion has to go on cards. With (AT)...


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