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A quoted comment (by lloyd 2019-02-05 12:54 UTC) from an interesting article about the 6303, MC3 - A DIY 8-bit computer (emphasis is mine): I used those same '80s processors a lot and still find much to like about them, especially the 6303's instruction set which was a joy for assembly programming. skipp, that repeater manual's a labour of love! Can't help ...


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I worked in 1984-86 on CAD software for 6502 machines. We did our coding, assembling and linking on CP/M, and wrote a few utilities in C for the CP/M side during 1984. It was probably Aztec C, and using that for firmware would have have been rather brave, but C compilers were definitely around. Microsoft may not have had one until later, but they weren't ...


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In my experience, 1983 would be possible but a little on the early side for people to be doing systems programming in C on 8-bit machines. I had summer jobs in 1982, 1983, and 1984 at Digital Research Inc., which was a fairly big systems house in Pacific Grove, CA, that sold operating systems such as CP/M and MP/M, and also sold compilers. The summer of 1984 ...


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The Hitachi 6303 is unlike typical 8-bit CPUs of the era, and is in fact suitable for high level language programming and C in particular. It has a stack that can hold local variables. Subroutines are entrant, and parameters are passed on the stack. It supports 16-bit pointers that can point anywhere in memory. It has a fairly orthogonal instruction set ...


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I started programming 1984 on a Sinclair (Farewell, Sir Clive!) ZX Spectrum, (which was invented two yeas earlier). Around 1983 was the start of the golden era of 8-bit "home computers" like the ZX spectrum, the C64, Ti99/4A, the BBC computer etc., and the Apple 2e. Keep in mind that those computers had 64k or less RAM (the ZX81 had 1K, the ViC 20 ...


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A personal anecdote: My first computer book in 1981 was called "Programming the Z80". It was focussed on assembly. I had learned Fortran in school but the main language for my home computer was Basic. Assembly was necessary for joystick and keyboard commands for a game I made. As a language, Assembly on the Z80 felt so fast but also terrible to ...


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I was programming full-time on Aztec-C (for Z-80s) starting in mid to late 1982. Our target systems were embedded devices using STD-Bus. We used CP/M as a dev environment. The company also had business systems (mostly written in C) that ran on CP/M (my team would get pulled in when they'd get lost). Those systems used the full 64k, and swapped memory in ...


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Full C compilers on the 8-bit series was not widely seen, but "mini-C" and "tiny-C" compilers were fairly common. One example is the OSS tiny-C for the Atari machines or Abacus on the C64. At the time, Pascal was still a major force, and Pascal compilers tended to be more common on the 8-bit machines. Smaller versions of Pascal/Algol were ...


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How often was C used to program firmware for 8-bit processors in the early 80s? It would have been a rather unusual choice in 1983. True, C was slowly creeping in, but only on 'big' machines and 16 bit. If a high level language was used at all, then it was more likely some PL/1 derivation or maybe a BASIC compiler. Especially the later was rather common on ...


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