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1

Just a small addition from the technical department: trackdisk.device (TDD) polls the disk status in regular intervalls. In order to detect a quick disk change in between two polls, the drive latches a DC status until the head is moved. So, TDD needs to move the head to update the status. Moving the head outwards usually stops once track 0 is reached by ...


-1

The sound is caused by the drive head hitting the backstop. By default trackdisk.device periodically steps it inwards, causing it to hit the backstop every time. From version 33.7 of trackdisk.device an alternative method is available that steps the head out, and then in again alternately. That way it doesn't hit anything. Other utilities that do this either ...


0

The click is caused by the drive head hitting the backstop that prevents it stepping beyond the location of track 1. The Amiga floppy controller can only detect when there is a disk inserted when stepping the drive head, so the trackdisk.device that operates it periodically steps the head against the backstop, causing the clicking sound. Revision 33.7 of ...


5

On the Amiga, CIA 1 is used for the disk controller, and Port A on CIA 1 is used to sense the state of the /DSKCHANGE signal from a pin on the floppy drive interface of the currently selected unit (Amigas support up to 4 daisy-chained floppy drives). The /DSKCHANGE signal is latched in the active (low) state when a disk is removed, and Amiga floppy drives ...


3

The floppy drives have a "disk inserted" sensor and signal wire. When a disk is removed, the signal changes immediately. But when a disk is inserted, the signal does not change automatically, but only when the disk head is moved. Amiga handles this by stepping the drive head of empty drives every couple of seconds - if a disk has been inserted, the ...


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