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3

One big improvement of 3.5 over 3.1 is the "big drive" native support (by patching ROM calls) Without a separate NSD patch (new style device) installed, OS 3.1 could not handle drives bigger than 4Gb properly. Everything written after the 4Gb boundary destroyed the existing data by writing on the first sectors instead (the disk position was a 32-...


3

From what I've read over time, AmigaOS 3.5 and 3.9 do not make any changes to the underlying operating system other than they now requires at least a 68020 processor. AmigaOS 3.5 and 3.9 still rely on the Amiga Kickstart 3.1 ROMs which is where most of the code lives that handles the bits you're asking about (memory management, etc). The OS could have ...


5

There are many routine features of a MOD that do not map directly to the IIGS sound hardware — besides the 64kb limit, the Ensoniq also requires samples to be a power-of-two in size and will loop entire samples only. MODs frequently have a loop point somewhere after the start. On the plus side it can trigger an interrupt at the end of any channel's playback ...


1

Maybe this one, Wild Wheels from Ocean: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oStzsQYLhKU


2

In an analog television set, the vertical and horizontal sync circuits are independent, but both need to derive their trigger signals from a common source. As a general concept, a short "low-going" pulse [which is modulated for broadcast as an increase in signal level] will trigger the horizontal sync circuit, while a long pulse will trigger the ...


4

The CSYNC looks perfectly normal for a standard 576i or 480i composite signal, just like how sync signals on composite video and analog TV transmissions work. The video signal standards define that serrated equalizing sync pulses are sent at twice the HSYNC rate during the VSYNC and few lines before and after it. This is to allow the VSYNC to be detected ...


9

In analog TV, there was such thing as interlace. Roughly speaking, it kind of increased vertical resolution by putting scanlines of one "halfframe" (the one that lasts 20ms or goes 50 times per second, or, alternatively, 16.6ms and 60 Hz) between the scanlines of previous halfframe (saying scanlines I mean lines lit by electron beam on CRT). As the ...


6

Since I can't comment, I thought I'd add to mcleod_ideafix's answer and explain how pitch is handled with the existing code -- it's using 16.16 fixed point arithmetic. So, if you wanted the loop to increment one address per loop; you'd provide a value of $00010000, but if you wanted to halve the frequency, you'd provice $00008000. What's happening here is ...


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