26

I did that all the time on the Apple II. The reason it worked was that some time was needed for the motor to spin up to the correct speed, and that the Disk II didn't really have an "eject" mechanism, but that you could very directly mechanically lift the read-write head from the surface of the disk. That meant that if you were quick enough to lift the ...


16

Theoretically, yes. The disk needs time to spin up to speed before reading or writing can occur. While it varies between platforms and drives, it's at least a couple hundred milliseconds. That's arguably just enough time to realize you shouldn't have hit enter, and to pop the drive latch. Especially if you subconsciously realize it before you even hit ...


11

Original all three have different meanings and are (in part) based on different implementations. But, as you already assume in your answer, people may have taken the name and used it with differend (usualy simpler) implementations Is there a backstory to the catalog command The term "Catalog(ue)" goes quite in line how IBM's terminology is based on ...


9

A plausible but impossible-to-prove history could be that the HP 2000A Time-Shared BASIC System (1968–~1976) had the CATALOG command (see http://bitsavers.trailing-edge.com/pdf/hp/2000TSB/22687-90009_LearningTSB.pdf, page 39). Woz ‘grew up’ with HP systems, so it may have been natural that the Apple disk system was inspired by HP commands (as with DEC ...


6

The question asks about microcomputer operating systems. I think the answer for such systems is that the authors simply reused whatever words they were familiar with from earlier systems. For earlier systems, I further guess that the authors of those systems just used whatever seemed like a good word at the time, and which they hadn't already used for some ...


5

DOS-ordered images were created by DOS programs that started reading from track 0 sector 0, continued to sector 15, moved to track 1 sector 0, and so on until the end of the disk. They are in DOS logical order: the first 256 bytes are T0S0, the next are T0S1, and so on. ProDOS-ordered images are created by ProDOS programs that started reading from block 0, ...


4

I did some looking around on the internet archive, browsing through a few collections, and I ran across this variant: Rhode Island Apple Group Volume 14 - Integer Basic Games The disk contains a what could be a variation, or an ancestor (or even a descendant) of the code listed above. There are enough similarities to look suspicious, but most of these ...


4

The program appears as "HELLO AUTO SELECT" in various public domain software collections that seem to derive from 1981 or earlier. This name appears in The Public Domain Exchange disk 166: "Hello and Menu" in The Best Apple Public Domain Software book from 1985, which states: The software in this book was compiled from user groups and individuals. It ...


4

The first filesystems were not stored on disk, but on tape. Usually tapes could only reliably be appended to or overwritten entirely, and could only be accessed in a more-or-less sequential order. Reading the entire tape just to find out what was stored on it was a very slow operation. It's likely that the terms catalogue and list originated from a ...


2

A good start is always the collection of Apple related mirrors at https://mirrors.apple2.org.za/. Quite reliable and fast. They include a copy of ftp.apple.asimov.net (slow), were the 1980 Master can be found at /images/masters/. Apple.Asimov.Net is the semi official collection of all things Apple historical.


2

As a former floppy disc repair technician, you can indeed do this, but you risk damaging the read-write heads and/or the alignment of the heads, rendering the drive unusable until it is repaired or replaced.


1

Interesting question. I do not remember anything like it. The Prodos MLI was rather frugal and offered, beside file system related access, only five funtions: GET_TIME, ALLOC/DEALLOC_TNTERRUPTand READ/WRITE_BLOCK. But then again, I really used only ProDOS 8, so there might be more in ProDOS 16.


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