14

No, conversion to 16-sector format (and the necessary change from DOS 3.2 to DOS 3.3) was a consequence of Steven Wozniak realizing that he could get more capacity by tweaking the Apple II floppy driver controller hardware slightly. To quote from here: After the Disk II had been in production for a while, Woz found out that the 8μs spec for the maximum ...


12

TL;DR: No, not really. It was even more twisted. 16 sector was done for the Pascal System for the Apple II, independently and before the Apple III got it, but didn't get rolled out for DOS until after the Apple III was introduced (and failed). Wozniak developed the 16 sector format in 1979 for the Apple Pascal System, as otherwise the UCSD P-System would ...


10

According to the Apple III Plus Owner's Guide, the interlace mode is called "text interlace": text interlace a Feature of the Apple III console that, when activated, increases the resolution of text characters on the display screen. Page 39 provides a little more detail: So "text interlace" is simply a mode designed to enhance the appearance of text ...


9

On Jan 7, 2012, Dave Ottalini, Washington Apple Pi Apple III SIG Chair, announced on the Facebook Apple /// Enthusiasts group that their Apple /// DVD, which formerly sold for $35, is now reclassified as public domain This is now on archive.org: https://archive.org/details/dvdrom-wap-apple3 Notable in this collection (which you can browse) is some Q&A ...


8

I was playing around with an emulated Apple /// and while looking at the color demo I noticed that unlike the Apple ][, Not really, as the Apple II also didn't do red, just orange. Apple II colours were black, green, purple and white plus blue and orange when shifted (*1), the /// did not implement red as one of its supported colors. While in Apple II ...


6

How can I recognise in the p-Code, that this is an integer function and has not 3 parameter values (6 bytes = 3 words data). Has not? To be honest, I'm a bit confused about what you're asking. So here are my two (no, not cents) possible interpretations of this question. If it's about how many parameters a function has: In p-code functions always have (at ...


5

I had an Apple III on my desk at Apple, and IIRC, Dan Kottke, who was working at a lab bench near mine, told me to try this if the III started acting flakey. Then later, he found another solution (forget what that was). Instead, I would periodically open the case and press the chips and connectors fully back into their sockets. Sometime I would feel/hear ...


2

I can't speak to the original question, but similar issues/solutions are well known. I had an Atari ST with socketed ROMs. They would periodically work their way out due to heat causing the mobo to flex. This was periodically solved by the "Atari twist", which would reset them sometimes, or simply dropping the machine. These would eventually stop working ...


2

If you look at the return code in the function above "RNP 01" stands for "return from nonbase procedure and return 1 word as a function result. Therefore this must be an integer/scalar/boolean function. As already mentioned by @Raffzahn the compiler always assigns 2 null bytes as extra parameters for any function. This function has 3 data words: loc1 = ...


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