86

I was working in software development at the time, and this wasn't seen as a problem. Colour monitors were expensive and not usually high-quality. In PC-compatibles, the Colour Graphics Adapter (640x200) wasn't regarded as adequate to be the only display on a machine; the Enhanced Graphics Adapter (640x350) appeared the same year as the original Mac, but ...


85

This is most certainly a myth. There was no conspiracy by Steve Jobs or Apple to prevent third-parties from engaging with the ecosystem that would eventually flourish for Classic Macintosh applications. Interestingly, one of the earliest, significant, 3rd party applications to be released for the Macintosh was Microsoft Word in 1985. Microsoft had already ...


46

TL;DR: Exactly as you assume. The CPU shovelled the data around, even way slower than your calculation suggests, and everyone was happy about the high speed with which it happened :) To be honest, I'm not complete sure what your question is. It was a plain bitmap display (like you assumed) and quite sufficient to be handled by the CPU. After all, no-one was ...


39

The Mac was designed from the start to be a GUI-based machine so clear, high-resolution graphics were a requirement. At the same time available memory was extremely limited due to cost considerations. The original Macintosh only had 128kB of RAM of which over 21kB were used by the display. Going to even 8-bit color at that resolution would have pushed the ...


38

The ones you list are all S.A.M, from what is now SoftVoice Inc. It was developed first for the Apple II, Lisa, Atari 8-bit machines and the Commodore 64; based on awareness of those versions, the company was contracted directly to supply the bundled speech generators for the Macintosh and Amiga. So they all sound the same because they are ports of the same ...


31

The premise of his argument was that Apple could have ruled the world with the Macintosh (as in, Windows/IBM Compatibles wouldn't have had a 90% or whatever market share) but Steve Jobs was just too hard headed and wouldn't let anyone, except maybe Adobe, develop for it. This is actually a distortion of the real argument. Apple never stopped other ...


31

The Early Days As you said, the most important languages on the Mac in its early days were Microsoft's BASIC, Pascal, and, of course, 68000 assembly. The Macintosh's System Software and ROMs were themselves programmed largely in assembly, with a bit of Pascal thrown in (mostly for pieces that were ported directly from the Lisa). C was merely a niche ...


30

Memory protection. It's not that preemptive multi-tasking is expensive, or hard. It's not. It's easy. It costs (or can cost) essentially the same as cooperative multitasking. You have to save process state in both cases. But what was holding back the older systems was their early reliance on systems without inherent memory protection, and those legacies ...


28

There were three important design aspects of the original Macintosh that allowed the relatively limited video display hardware to provide a pleasing user experience in terms of the performance of its GUI. Vertical blanking hardware interrupt - this provided the necessary timing for software to synchronize display updates to the CRT refresh cycle. Thus,...


28

I imagine it being a huge downgrade for some, not to have color on the Macintosh. Macintosh games were black and white in the beginning, while Apple II had color. For back then the whole assumption of a 512x342 pixel B&W display being a downgrade from a display with an effective (*1) colour resolution of 140x192 is so strange(*2), I doubt anyone would ...


22

So the way Wikipedia puts it, sounds like the decision was basically made by committee. And that's what it was - and what made it succeed. A standardized disk format with a drive interface compatible with existing controllers. As I understood it, the big breakthrough for the 90 mm format that ended up winning, was getting into the Macintosh [...] Not ...


21

Preface As Stephen rightly points out in his comment, SheepShaver only emulates PowerPC, and so it is not a valid suggestion for your 68K-based question. From SheepShaver's home page However, you still need a copy of MacOS and a PowerMac ROM image to use SheepShaver. If you attempt to use a 68K based ROM, with SheepShaver, then you should get the error:...


21

The first set of Inside Macintosh books was about 1000 pages of documentation covering everything you needed to write a Macintosh application, and was available from the beginning. It didn't only cover the APIs, but also gave advice on how to design the user interface, since it was one of the first GUIs. Folklore.org has a story about the process of writing ...


20

There was, at one time, a custom tool for this job called the "Mac Cracker" and Apple provided their own to dealers and authorized repair shops. In essence, what you need is a long handled Torx T15 driver and a spudger or similar tool to pry the halves of the case apart without damaging the plastic. There are other examples of "case crackers" that do the ...


20

As others have said, refreshing the whole screen in a fraction of a second was considered blindingly fast at that time. The Mac's biggest early advantage, though, was the QuickDraw framework. This was leaps and bounds ahead of other graphics packages of the day, both in functionality and efficiency. With QuickDraw, you rarely had to rewrite the whole ...


19

The (plain) 68k never had anything directly comparable to the Intel x86 range's Protected Mode. When Intel introduced the Protected mode (PM) to its x86 range of CPUs, this lifted a number of restrictions, though, that the 68k range never had: PM allowed the OS designer to protect (hence the name...) certain address ranges from access from non-privileged ...


19

Speaking for the Macintosh here. TL;DR: It wasn't possible to do this in a compatible manner after the hardware was capable enough. Compatible to the already existing application base. You'll need to see this in context with the heritage of the Macintosh Operating System itself. It was built to run in an considerably limited environment, regarding CPU ...


18

Basilisk II works well on Linux (it's even packaged for Debian) and provides most of the features you're looking for. I know I've used the following: 68040 emulation; host filesystem access inside the emulator; pass-through networking. I believe it also supports pass-through CD-ROM access, and possibly ISO-image-based CD-ROM emulation.


17

It wasn’t typically in the application’s name, it was in the name of the folder containing the application, and used to mean “folder.” For example, the folder containing SurfWriter, its Apple Guide help file, its template files, and so on may have been named “SurfWriter ƒ” either by the developer or by a user. Often developers named the folder something ...


16

I think this page (on archive.org) is about that adapter, which it calls the "AR5328 Apple to VGA monitor adapter." Other sources call it a "Mac to VGA adapter." It works with the Mac LC "pizza boxes," Performa, Quadra, etc. The switches are used to configure the adapter for the sync mode supported by the monitor (composite sync, sync on green, separate sync,...


16

If you have a system running on your IIci you could presumably use that to format your drive, but I'm guessing that's not the case. To build a working image on the SD card, there are two things to get right: the partition map, and the HFS filesystem itself. The SCSI2SD wiki has a page detailing the steps; the short version is setup an old Mac system in an ...


16

The HFS filesystem stores file metadata in a single large file called the "catalog file", with one record for each file or directory. Creation and modification times are stored as 32-bit unsigned integers representing a count of seconds since midnight, January 1, 1904. (Source: Inside Macintosh: Files)


15

Your Mac II “HMMU” chip implements the address functionality shown in this image, from Guide to the Macintosh Family Hardware, 2nd edition: The chip has two modes of operation. In 24-bit mode, the addresses are mapped as shown and the top 8 bits of the address bus are ignored. In 32-bit mode the address is buffered unchanged. Early versions of the Mac ...


14

You can "bring Rosetta back" by installing an older version of Mac OS X which supports it — Tiger, Leopard or Snow Leopard (on the latter it's an optional component). Rosetta was removed from later version for licensing reasons. If you have an installation CD for PowerPC Mac OS X, you can use a full-system emulator to run it. Currently it seems your best ...


14

The video signals are on the 14-pin Mini-Fit Jr. connection that goes between the logic board and the analog board. It's labeled J12 on the logic board. You can see it labeled in this image: You can find the schematics at museum.dyne.org.


14

You can find a list of capacitors and other analog board components here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/132RwzC8HM5ask-BdY_31txErOCwJDSkz099GY2XLpE0/edit?hl=en&hl=en#gid=0 This list is maintained by James Wages. The analog boards for the 128k, 512k, and Plus are compatible with 3 different revisions. Digikey part numbers for replacement parts ...


14

To start with, the only hardware needed for preemptive multitasking is an interrupt capable timer. Everything else can be done in software. Though, some memory management would be helpful. Besides custom solutions, that hardware was already ready available off the shelf for 8-bit CPUs. Beside more generic solutions like TI's 74610 series, more advanced ...


14

I believe the assumptions of the question are wrong. We did not buy the Mac to play games, it was more or less strictly a business machine. Main usage in the beginning around me was creation of printed material including illustrations. Slightly later the laser printer came along making it possible to create camera ready material inhouse. Of course, I could ...


13

Classic MacOS uses : as a directory separator. / doesn't have a special meaning and is a legal filename character. Additionally, a leading : is a relative path, not an absolute path. MacOS Unix ----- ---- file.c file.c Volume: /Volume Volume:file.c /Volume/file.c :folder:file.c folder/file.c


13

Any 68882 in PLCC form factor should work if it's rated at least as fast as your main CPU (always use the effective CPU frequency, e.g. if you overclocked it). Since the 68882 is a static design, faster versions will work just fine. Usually the last digit of the part number is the rated speed in MHz: MC68882FN16 ^ ^ ^ ^ | | | rated 16 MHz | | PLCC ...


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