56 votes

Why was MacOS unix certified?

According to Terry Lambert, the engineer who led the project to make MacOS comply with the Single UNIX Specification, [...] it was done to get Apple out of a $200M lawsuit filed by The Open Group, ...
komadori's user avatar
  • 484
41 votes
Accepted

Why did nobody ever succeed in "clean room" cloning the Apple Macintosh?

MS-DOS was not exclusive to the IBM PC and Microsoft sold it to companies that then produced both non-IBM PC compatible and latter IBM PC compatible machines bundled with MS-DOS. They did not have to ...
Brian's user avatar
  • 822
36 votes

Why did nobody ever succeed in "clean room" cloning the Apple Macintosh?

TL;DR: It Was Done, But Timing Wasn't Helpful There are at least two technically successful, but economically unsuccessful, 100% (or close enough) clones: Unitron's Mac 512 Clone of 1985 and NuTek's ...
Raffzahn's user avatar
  • 223k
27 votes

Does DB15 actually exist?

"DB" doesn't mean that it has 25 pins, but that the connector is as wide as the DB-25 you're familiar with (which is actually correctly named). A DB-15 could sort of exist, but it would have ...
hobbs's user avatar
  • 5,093
26 votes

Did the original Macintosh not have any MIDI or similar music capabilities?

The original Macintosh has a single-channel 8-bit 22kHz PCM output; it reads from memory and sets a new output level once per scan line of the video output. It’s up to software to generate waveforms ...
Tommy's user avatar
  • 36.9k
25 votes
Accepted

Does DB15 actually exist?

The second letter of a D-Sub connector indicates the size of the shell. Apple tended to use the DA-15 connector: a larger one than VGA, with a lower pin density and only two rows of pins. There's one ...
scruss's user avatar
  • 21.6k
24 votes

Why was MacOS unix certified?

So the systems could be sold into organizations that happened to have a "must be Unix certified" on their checklist of requirements. Who would have such a requirement? Who knows. Certainly ...
Will Hartung's user avatar
  • 12.3k
22 votes
Accepted

What were the most common software distribution formats for MacOS Classic?

Up until things like Compuserve and AOL (and then Internet for the masses) came around, floppy disks would have more or less been the only option. (CD-ROM drives in consumer machines arrived only a ...
ssokolow's user avatar
  • 6,765
19 votes

Did the original Macintosh not have any MIDI or similar music capabilities?

Tommy already answered the basic facts, so I would like to put the various assumption a bit into perspective. The Mac version is entirely mute, save for some random sound samples which seem to be ...
Raffzahn's user avatar
  • 223k
19 votes

Why was MacOS unix certified?

I do not know the exact answer (so if this is too much speculation, feel free to close as subjective), but I do remember the situation Apple was back in at the time, and my theory is "Because ...
Michael Stum's user avatar
  • 1,680
15 votes

What were the most common software distribution formats for MacOS Classic?

The "System 6/7-era" extends from 1988 to at least 1997 — 10 years that saw a a lot of changes in the IT industry[1]. From personal experience, Software distribution was mostly on physical ...
Michael Graf's user avatar
  • 10.1k
14 votes
Accepted

Classic Mac OS colors to modern RGB

The fact that the color channel values range from 0 to 65535 instead of 0 to 255 is a trivial difference. You can just divide by 65535/255 = 257 (and round to the nearest integer). The real problem is ...
benrg's user avatar
  • 1,957
11 votes

Classic Mac OS colors to modern RGB

For the System 7 icon colours at least, it may help to look at them as hex values: R G B 65535, 65535, 52428 : ffff, ffff, cccc 65535, 52428, 39321 : ffff, cccc, 9999 52428, ...
scruss's user avatar
  • 21.6k
11 votes

What were the most common software distribution formats for MacOS Classic?

In terms of formats for BBS/online distribution, StuffIt and MacBinary were common for binary transfers. BinHex was common for 7-bit text-based transfers. All three preserved the data fork, resource ...
Kelvin Sherlock's user avatar
11 votes

Does DB15 actually exist?

TL;DR: Get a Mac-to-VGA Dongle The Quadra can be easy connectet to a contemporary multi-sync screen using a DA15 to DE15 dongle. They still show up with vendors as well as on Ebay. Keywords Mac to VGA,...
Raffzahn's user avatar
  • 223k
10 votes

Does DB15 actually exist?

which apparently do not exist, since the naming convention does not technically allow for DB15 In the original naming scheme from the original manufacturer of the connectors, there was/is no such ...
Peter Green's user avatar
  • 2,912
9 votes

Classic Mac OS colors to modern RGB

If you have images that use these palettes, the AppleRGB.icc colour profile can be used to apply the γ = 1.8 of the old Apple Trinitron colour monitors, amongst other corrections required for colour ...
scruss's user avatar
  • 21.6k
8 votes

What is the motherboard part number for the Macintosh IIci that required parity memory?

661-0532 Logic Board Mac IIci 661-0583 Logic Board Mac IIci Parity from myoldmac.net - Apple Computer Model Part Numbers, confirmed in Apple's own Apple Module Identification, June 1994, pages xx and ...
scruss's user avatar
  • 21.6k
8 votes

Did the original Macintosh not have any MIDI or similar music capabilities?

Although the MIDI 1.0 standard was first published in 1984, the first commercial computer (as opposed to sequencers or synthesizers) to incorporate MIDI was the Atari ST in 1985. Macs didn't have MIDI ...
Stephen M. Webb's user avatar
7 votes

Recently acquired a Macintosh Plus M0001A, and it won't boot

Do I understand correctly that half the time you get a checkerboard pattern, and half the time you get a sad Mac? Do you mean large checker board squares, or single pixel checkerboard squares? The ...
scott.squires's user avatar
6 votes

What HyperCard extensions did Myst use?

I did an exhaustive reverse-engineering spelunking trip of Myst on Twitch (and archived it here https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZjGMBjt_VVCl3cftfjeO8qQsSxgDQYO1). It explains a lot of the ...
uliwitness's user avatar
5 votes

What were the most common software distribution formats for MacOS Classic?

The existing answers deal with "official" methods, but there were also "unofficial" methods1, for those with low incomes. Macintosh software, back then2, was prohibitively ...
Greenonline's user avatar
  • 4,356
5 votes
Accepted

Building a "hello, world!" program using MPW

TL;DR It is perfectly possible to run command line tools (that use stdio.h), on a Macintosh, but only from within MPW. For MPW 3.2.3 C hello.c Link -d -c 'MPS ' -t MPST hello.c.o "{CLibraries}&...
Greenonline's user avatar
  • 4,356
4 votes

Building a "hello, world!" program using MPW

Classic MacOS has no concept of stdin/stdout compared to POSIX conformant platforms. See the comment of Hugh Fisher for a workaround. It might be beneficial to read the initial Inside Macintosh books ...
PoC's user avatar
  • 1,102
3 votes

Setting email up on MacOS System 7

This VOGONS thread covers someone asking a similar question about getting Outlook Express 5 to log into GMail back in 2018. You have two (possibly three) problems to solve: The mail host now ...
ssokolow's user avatar
  • 6,765
3 votes
Accepted

Mac Plus refusing to read disks

This is typical of a drive failure. Your best bet is probably to try to clean the drive first, since a dirty drive is the most common (and easiest/cheapest to fix) way a drive can stop functioning. A ...
nboyko's user avatar
  • 180
3 votes

Did the original Macintosh not have any MIDI or similar music capabilities?

As noted elsewhere, the Macintosh sound hardware clocks a DAC at 22,050Hz. Although there is no hardware for multi-voice music, early versions of Inside Macintosh described three sets of ROM routines ...
supercat's user avatar
  • 36.3k
2 votes

Did the original Macintosh not have any MIDI or similar music capabilities?

Yes, the original 1984 Mac had 3 ways to do it Inside Macintosh was Apple's official documentation for the original 1984 Macintosh. Chapter 8 of volume II describes the Sound Manager: The Sound ...
DrSheldon's user avatar
  • 16k
2 votes

How was it back then in 1984, when the Apple II had color, and the new Macintosh didn't?

What most answers here missed is that it was not the colour or resolution that the Lisa first, the Macintosh both inspired by the Xerox Alto, then brought to the table that was considered progress. It ...
Patrick Schlüter's user avatar
1 vote

Recently acquired a Macintosh Plus M0001A, and it won't boot

From your descriptions, I'd say the machinery suffers from worn electrolytic caps. Maybe seek help in a local hacker space?
PoC's user avatar
  • 1,102

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