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67

TL;DR: As explained on Steven Weyhrich's great and authoritative Apple II History Site, Wozniak simply sat down and wrote his Integer-BASIC (*1) on paper, while assembling it at the same time by hand. In his own words: I had no assembler, that was another thing. To use an assembler, they figured that somebody was going to buy this processor to use for a ...


47

This seemingly well-researched article from a design magazine says According to Janoff [designer of the logo], the reason for choosing this bitten apple logo is to prevent people from confusing the shape of the apple with some other fruit like cherry or tomato, having a similar form. It also mentions the byte/bite pun, but says that was just a coincidence. ...


38

One thing is certain: Steve Wozniak was very good at hand assembling 6502. Instead of writing assembler mnemonics he could simply type in the necessary hex code. I realize this isn't a proper answer but this anecdote is simply too good to relegate to a comment. It comes from Bill Atkinson remarking on Steve doing some assembler work: The other thing that ...


32

According to official sources, the name Apple came first. In an interview with Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, recorded to an internal Apple video, it is explained that the name just… appeared. The recording is kept in an archive at Stanford; while the video itself is not available publicly, Terence Chea of the Associated Press transcribes it as follows: ...


19

Ok, I found the image I had formed in my mind - it was from Dr. Dobbs Journal, Volume 1, Number 8, 1976. - But my memory was wrong about pre-dating Apple. The article is actually titled "A 6502 Disassembler from Apple by Steve Wozniak and Allen Baum".


13

That apple by his deathbed has become the most famous in science since Isaac Newton’s windfall, with claims that Turing poisoned it so he could mimic the one in his favourite fairy-tale, Disney’s Snow White, and – repeatedly – that it inspired Apple’s famous once-bitten logo. Although writer/actor/presenter/technophile Stephen Fry says that when he asked ...


13

Woz was exceptional, but not the only one with this (moderate level of ?) skill in machine language. Lots of teens/kids learned to poke (from Basic) absolute hex machine code into memory on several models of personal computers (not just the Apple I/II). I knew some who could speak out-loud a small subroutine in hex for the 6502, no assembly language or ...


8

There are two types of graphic cards that were produced back in the day: 80-column cards. Video enhancing graphics cards. === 80 Columns === For #1, there were a few companies that produced 80-column cards for the Apple II and II+ machines which were only capable of generating 40-column, uppercase-only text. Videx was one such company and produced cards ...


7

Personal privacy, in general, was a major issue in the 70s in America, maybe more so than today even. In the previous decade there had been scandals with illegal wiretaps by the US government and major legal cases expanding and engaging with the constitutional right to privacy. The first US federal laws on privacy were passed in the mid-1970s. In the ...


7

At that time he worked at HP, where they had of course the needed promer - the only drawback was that he had to walk to another building, as you already cited (in another question) from iWoz: I couldn’t write a new program into the PROMs. To do that, I’d have to go to that other building again, just to burn the program into the chip. I guess he did it a ...


7

The 6502 works with a single square wave clock signal that is connected to Phi0 pin 37. The chip has a built-in clock generator to use this clock input to internally generate two anti-phase non-overlapping clocks and will output these on two clock output pins, Phi1 (3) and Phi2 (39). The 6800 also needs two anti-phase non-overlapping clocks for internal ...


6

It probably has something to do with the fact that Jobs was at one point on a diet of almost nothing but apples. He was spending his college time looking in on all sorts of courses from philosophy to calligraphy. It was also the time of "dropping out" of mainstream society and questioning everything about diet, drugs, people living in groups, ...


5

All the Apple //c machines from September 1986 onward have an additional 34-pin header on the motherboard designed for memory expansion boards. Apple offered their own expansion board which support up to 1MiB of additional memory internal to the Apple //c. Other manufacturers, such as Applied Engineering offered 3rd party versions of these memory expansion ...


4

I’ve got a 2005 PowerMac G5, Dual 2.3 GHz with a stock Nvidia GeForce 6600 running OSX 10.4 Tiger AFAIR that's a plain 6600, right? Would adding a second GeForce 6600 from another PowerMac work or even be useful? Not really. I believe the GeForce 6600 supports only a single Dual-Link DVI output (while it has 2x DVI ports on the back) so it should support ...


3

Z-RAM installs into the CPU and MMU sockets of the IIc (the chips have to be removed from the motherboard and placed on the Z-RAM). The memory expansion connector that later IIcs have is not used. Even if there aren't any physical "slots" in the IIc, its operating system uses "virtual slots" for compatibility with the classic Apple II. (...


2

How about a USI monitor like the one shown here : https://www.si.edu/newsdesk/photos/apple-ii-computer? or a "National" as shown here:


2

Startup is when the CMOS data is accessed; it's likely that you will need to reset PRAM (parameter random access memory, aka CMOS) by holding down command-option-P-R for several seconds after powering ON. There will be a beep to acknowledge the reset, usually one waits for the beep to repeat, then you can let go. The backup battery for the CMOS is (if ...


1

it's mentioned the Apple II's slot 7 was used by third party graphics cards. I'm a bit suspicious here, as slot 7 wasn't any more capable for generic graphic cards than any other slot. As Dirkt already mentioned in his answer: [...] There's not really a lot you can do with them, except cater for some different TV encoding system. And that's exactly the ...


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