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Long story short: some BASICs have "two-byte signed integers" all around, so they can work only with numbers between -32768 and +32767. Other BASICs have their own format of numbers (e.g. Sinclair's ZX Spectrum BASIC - it uses 5 bytes to store a simple integer, so it can be -65535..65535). In the second case, it is up to the BASIC interpreter developer, ...


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The difference between Applesoft BASIC and the other Microsoft 6502 BASIC derivatives can be explained by the fact that Applesoft BASIC was not the first BASIC for the Apple II; the first was Apple II Integer BASIC, in turn derived from Apple I BASIC, which had been independently created by The Woz. Integer BASIC supported only 16-Bit signed integers as a ...


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In some BASICs integers were signed 16-bit values, so there was no integer higher than 32767. Thus, if you wanted a 16-bit value of $FFFF in an integer variable,you'd have to specify it as -1. You can see this in Commodore 64 BASIC V2: X%=32767 READY X%=32768 ?ILLEGAL QUANTITY ERROR That said, the C64 SYS didn't actually take an integer parameter; it ...


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