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2

MAME emulates a fixed, finite (if rather large) list of arcade games. The complete circuit board layout of every game is stored in the MAME executable. All code and data needed for emulation of most of the chips is compiled into the MAME executable, but for practical reasons, the contents of ROM chips are stored in external files. This is partly to keep the ...


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When MAME started, the aim was to make the classic games work on a "modern" machine. For that, a lot of shortcuts were taken: hardcoding some game data / hardware color palette in the code giving names to EEPROMS that weren't the most logical sometimes the emulator used the Yamaha YM chip from the popular Sounblaster / AWE64 to play the sounds of ...


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While it doesn't "skip" per-se, you can press the Page Down key on your keyboard to temporarily unlock the speed throttling and somewhat "fast forward" through intros and such you don't want to wait around for. The key might not be universal, but in my experience it works for anything that isn't emulating a keyboard (e.g. Apple II ...


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The ability to skip cut scenes was a rather late addition to the arcade scene. I'm not quite sure why; if a player would rather skip a cut scene than spent time watching it, I can't imagine arcade operators being opposed. Pinball machines likewise took awhile to let players skip animation sequences, though in the days before such sequences could be skipped ...


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