19

The red function keys were a carry-over from the days of the BBC's Computer Literacy Project. The first computers made for the BBC by Acorn, the Model A and Model B featured red function keys: These red keys were a feature of all "BBC" computers, including the subsequent BBC Master series. The first machines of Acorn's Archimedes line were the A300 and ...


12

Different versions of MS-DOS and Windows shipped with different versions of HIMEM.SYS: Windows/286 2.10: HIMEM.SYS 1.1 (not an XMS driver) Windows/386 2.10, Windows 2.11: HIMEM.SYS 2.04 Windows 3.0: HIMEM.SYS 2.60 MS-DOS 5.0: HIMEM.SYS 2.77 Windows 3.1: HIMEM.SYS 3.07 MS-DOS 6.2 and later, Windows for Workgroups 3.11: HIMEM.SYS 3.10 (See KB74977 and ...


5

Acorn's BBC Micro series is well known for the range of add-on processors ... ... however, other Acorn computers (the Atom, the Electron and the ABC range) did not have such an interface. So the Tube interface was not Acorn specific, but it was specific for the BBC range of computers. ... given that its predecessors ... did support them? Of course any ...


4

The original BBC Micro was designed very quickly and was subject to internal debate over its processor; the 6502 was already seven years old, and the tube appears to have been a compromise: they would ship the base machine with only a 6502 and could then experiment with the various newer processors on the market after the fact, demoting the 6502 to a mere IO ...


4

The Stairway To Hell history site seems to indicate that the BBC did indeed get involved officially with the nascent A500. Sophie Wilson, the designer (then known as Roger): "Because the original ideas for an ARM-based computer had been for a business machine, Acorn's traditional partner, the BBC, hadn't been involved in the project (neither had new owner ...


4

Three contributory reasons: After the BBC Micro, Acorn were using their own processor They didn't need hardware to support other platforms Microsoft Windows hadn't cornered the market yet Using their own Processor In the 8-bit era, Acorn had used existing, off-the-shelf processors in their computers, predominantly the 6502. When designing the Acorn Proton (...


4

[Partitial answer about how it supports FPM RAM - I still need to look up the manual for timing details] Support for (Fast) Page Mode RAM (*1) The CPU supports N and S-cycles (ARM lingo) or Non-Sequential and Sequential cycles. The first access to any memory is always an N-cycle optional followed by S-cycles. To handle this the original ARM provided a signal ...


3

The inverse perspective is to consider that ARMs were optimised for relatively slow memory (FPM DRAM), compared to contemporary pure RISC designs such as SPARC and MIPS which were designed for high frequency (40MHz or more) in "expensive" computers with caches. As the target frequency was slower, ARM could afford more complex instructions than these RISCs (...


3

Some of the metadata attributed to files on Acorn filing systems date from the 8-bit implementations of ADFS (and the earlier DFS) on the BBC Micro. These include the address to load the file in memory (RAM) whean read from disk, and the address at which the OS should start executing the file (if it is executable). Key additions for RISC OS as used by the ...


3

Inspecting a couple of the files with hexdump and cross-referencing riscos documentation the file seems to be a sequence of 32-bit little endian words. Looking at the values the following is my best-guess as to the fields meaning. Word 0 appears to be the "load address"* field, on riscos this normally follows the form 0xFFFtttdd where ttt is the file type ...


3

There are no differences, except to the version number. The drivers are a various package distributed with DOS, Windows, and some compiler utilities. It is possible to use later ones, and even earlier ones. You can see from this table, that the versions have been generally updated through time. Value in (brackets) are reported from the emulation, value in ...


2

While there is no evidence that Acorn released a general-purpose co-processor, they did intend to (at one point). A review of the Archimedes line, in the August 1987 issue of Personal Computer World magazine, includes the following statement: So far Acorn has announced its intention to produce the following podules: 'Floating Point', a hardware ...


1

Because the BBC Micro was, for lack of a better term, sponsored by the BBC to get computers in schools, the Archimedes got similar experience from runoff from the micro. Even though it came out later.


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