17

I can only really answer from my own perspective, and I only wrote real code (other than simple BASIC programs) on an Atari over the last couple of years. IDE Used In terms of classic tools IDEs were relatively light compared to tools you get today. I worked using Devpac 3, which is a good assembler that includes some useful features and a debugger. STOS ...


17

If you're willing to spend some money, there are some nice options using the Atari's SIO port (the big trapezoidal plug on the side). Maybe the most flexible option is the SIO2PC adaptor, which lets you connect your Atari to a PC via serial or USB connection. This lets you do things like access a directory on your Mac or PC directly from the Atari, and ...


14

I used to program on the Atari about 20+ years ago, so I might be a bit rusty on the subject. Also I used to mainly write demo effects and music, so I wasn't working on core game development directly (other than writing music for some). IDE is a more modern concept, so you probably won't find one on the platform itself, but there are some out there for ...


14

On the Atari 8-bit machines, you'd use the real-time clock memory locations starting at offset 18; these are updated during every vertical blank: TIME = INT((PEEK(18) * 65536 + PEEK(19) * 256 + PEEK(20))/60) (on an NTSC system; divide by 50 for PAL). To measure your own time interval, the safest approach is to POKE all three values to 0 at the start of ...


12

One solution is to use the program published at COMPUTE! ISSUE 76 / SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 100 : http://www.atarimagazines.com/compute/issue76/AtariML.php The program heavily utilizes the BASIC "self-programming trick". First, let's explain the trick. An example - dynamically allocating a string of variable length - is located starting with line ...


6

The three commands correspond to three different storage formats. CSAVE drives the cassette recorder directly, and stores tokenized files using short inter-record gaps. This is the fastest mode (both when writing and reading) since it uses a compact representation and doesn't need to wait for the tape. SAVE "C:" uses the cassette tape driver, and stores ...


3

I used, and still have, the Laser C compiler for Atari ST. It is the later version of what was first branded as the Megamax C compiler. It was/is actually a pretty good C dev environment. It has quite a few libraries for useful functions and relevant stuff for the hardware and OS.


3

I very much enjoyed this blog post which discusses how to get started with 68k assembly and DevPac3. The learning curve with assembly is very steep, but it does offer you the best performance. If you want a gentler introduction to ST games programming, I can recommend STOS. It's a flavour of BASIC specifically designed for creating games.


2

I used DevPac all along for assembler and GFABasic for the tools. I remember that the Omikron basic was very popular in Germany. A lot of people starting had hopes with STOS, but I never got into it.


2

Here, actual screen shot with source, and proper way to reset timer and measure time... all run on 1979 Atari 800 (with Incognito board on Personality slot, enabling all available OS and Basic loads in existence, all the way up to XE/XEGS). In reality, it is much faster than most of the samples posted here, even with Interpreter-based Basic on 8K rom-space):...


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