24

The EHT (extra-high-tension) circuits used to drive colour CRT displays run at 25kV (kilo-volts), and the capacitors contain enough stored charge to kill you stone dead if you touch the wrong thing, and the stored charge does not disappear as soon as you switch the device off. I would take it to a repair shop if I were you. The technicians will have the ...


23

As well as being the first colour Mac-like, the Atari ST was absurdly competitive on price, being the first mainstream 68000-based home computer. The Amiga wasn’t relaunched for the home market until 1987*. As a result it is the original home of a wealth of innovative game software — especially in Europe it was often the lead platform for games until the ...


21

The (plain) 68k never had anything directly comparable to the Intel x86 range's Protected Mode. When Intel introduced the Protected mode (PM) to its x86 range of CPUs, this lifted a number of restrictions, though, that the 68k range never had: PM allowed the OS designer to protect (hence the name...) certain address ranges from access from non-privileged ...


16

Looking for either "rose.neo" atari or "rose.pc1" atari in Google images with an exact requested size of 320x200 yields this result, which seems to match your description pretty well. Could it be that one? EDIT #1 Here is a better version from Demozoo. EDIT #2 The original Neochrome file can be downloaded from this page.


13

How two 260ns RAM accesses could fit in 500ns? By using a 250ns (*1) tRC cycle? And yes, strictly that's out of spec. Still chances are very good that each and every chips will make it, as the timing range selected is rather conservative to start with. Even more so as this value is usually defined by the makers as being guarantied over the the whole ...


9

The CRT itself is essentially a high voltage, high capacitance device on steroids and can hold a charge for well over a week. Touching the wrong contacts with your bare hands will throw you across the room or kill you. Years ago I discharged a 26" CRT - melted the ground wire (10 AWG) and about 2" of a screwdriver...right hand paralyzed for almost a week. I ...


9

You may be referring to Barbarian and Barbarian II from game developer Psygnosis.


8

I'd say Zarch or as it was way more popular Virus. The game was originally conceived for the Acorn Archimedes, but soon ported to basically all platforms of the late 80s 16-bit era. There was a real hype. In fact, it was first distributed as a demo called 'Lander' with every new Archimedes computer, Making a really good case for buying one: Here are some ...


8

On both the Amiga and the Atari, external floppy drives don’t contain any “intelligence”, and the connectors are pin-to-pin. However the Amiga uses a 23-pin D connector whereas the Atari ST uses a 14-pin DIN connector, so the external drives aren’t directly compatible, and the drives themselves are setup differently. You could build a custom cable (with ...


8

The Open Source Scan Converter (OSSC) supports custom horizontal sample rates, even Amiga's PAL:Super-HiRes (1440×283) mode.


7

68000 had a protected mode as well (i.e. a special mode allowing the use of privileged/supervisor instructions not normally available to user code). Err, no. At least don't call it protected mode, call it supervisor mode or privileged mode. "Protected mode" implies something like the >=80286 protected mode which had hardware memory protection. This did not ...


7

So far as I recall, the Macintosh System Software didn't bother with the user versus supervisor mode distinction. Even after the release of System 7, which supported virtual memory, virtually everything ran in supervisor mode. I think the Apple Lisa, which had a more minicomputer-like (or what we'd today call Unix-like) operating system design, as well as ...


7

You are seeing dot crawl which is common when sending composite video into a low quality comb filter such as in that Video to VGA Converter box. To get rid of it, you will need a better comb filter (good ones are hard to find) or avoid composite entirely by converting from the STE's analog 15 kHz RGBHV to either the 31 kHz VGA that your monitor supports, or ...


7

Tommy's answer mentioned it just "en passant": You could buy one of Atari’s laser printers plus the ST, and DTP software for quite a bit less than Apple’s LaserWriter alone. but that was indeed one innovation that was brought by the Atari: bare laser printer without own rendering controller, using the computer to replace it. A technique that came ...


7

Hint: It would be great if you could extend your question not only with the number of bombs, but as well the setup and conditions used to produce them. I understand bombs are sort of code indicator of what is malfunctioning in the system, Jup, they are, so it would be nice if you could tell how many you see, as that is essentially the error code. similar ...


6

I'm virtually positive the game was Thunderstrike released in 1990 for the ST, Amiga, and DOS. The version I had was probably an early demo since I don't recall the various splash screens (besides the loading screen). The design of the loading screen, world and ships, the POV, as well as the gameplay are very close to what I recall and the ship selection ...


6

For the ST, the best option I’m aware of is to use the Atari-provided SCART cable and the OSSC; the latter will double lines etc. to produce a picture which any modern HDMI screen should be able to display. Depending on the outputs from your C64 (which may need to be modded anyway), the OSSC might not be appropriate; the RetroTINK 2X supports S-Video, ...


6

I can't find any info whatsoever. Most likely that's just a standard SCSI case (like Ross Ridge already assumed), notable due the existence of a terminator and an ACSI to SCSI cable (maybe even a homed made one). Being a rather standard drive it no hits may turn up in conjunction with Atari - in fact, there where zillions (almost) of shops that created ...


5

The Amiga and Atari ST were not compatible on either the floppy media format or on their floppy drives. The wiring is completely incompatible between the computer and the external floppy drives, most notably because the Amiga external floppy gets power from the computer and the ST external floppy has in built power supply. Also the Amiga disk format is based ...


5

Beyond the usual TOS compatibility issues which affected all Atari STs, the TT add the following twists: its faster CPU meant that some programs (games) ran too fast; this wasn’t as much of a problem as on the PC since most games used the vertical blank interrupt for timing; its 32-bit address bus meant that programs which used the top eight bits of ...


5

The question is sort of broad, since there are many ways to write software that targets the specifics of ST hardware, and which leads to programmer assumptions that break when the hardware changes even slightly. That said, you identified one of the main issues for games: the faster CPU. Not being able to slow the CPU down to the expected speed of the ST ...


5

Db is a debugger for the Atari ST and TT series of 68000-family computers... Db can use any of the ST's character devices for its input and output, including the screen, the serial port, and the MIDI port... Db is capable of debugging programs running on one machine while the bulk of the debugger runs on another. It lets you view the state of the ...


5

There are two problems here: dumping the disks, and loading them in your emulator. The general answer To dump Atari ST disks, you can use Pasti on your Atari computer; the advantage is that it works quite well, and won’t require any extra hardware. Using modern hardware, you’d probably have to look into a KryoFlux or SuperCard Pro and Aufit, which converts ...


4

The 130XE outputs Composite (CVBS) and S-Video (Y/C) through the 5-pin DIN connector. Converting this to 640x480 VGA is simple with something like a DVDO iScan Plus. The SM124 has a 71.25 Hz vertical scan rate and 31.5 kHz horizontal scan rate and outputs 640x400. It cannot handle any other type of signal, not even standard 640x480@60Hz VGA. If you were ...


4

Rather than try to 3-D print replacement keycaps, you might consider casting them in polyurethane resin. The advantages are: Lower initial cost (about $75 not including dye if you don't mind some minor imperfections, see below). No need to do any CAD modeling. The cast keycaps take the same texture as the original. No 3D print layer lines. A nearly perfect ...


4

As it happens, I have my own archived copy of the STe Discovery Xtra Language disk here. Here's ROSE.NEO: I've screencapped all of the Neochrome images I have on this disk and put them on Imgur: https://imgur.com/gallery/bjs5OTC That's perhaps the full original set from that disk; I guess I was careful with preservation even when I was a teenager. No bear ...


4

What is the total size of 1040STE with 4 of these SIMMs installed? Should be 4 MiB. The chips shown are MiBit chips (1 Mi x 1). 8 of them give a Mibyte per SIMM. It also fits, as 4 MiB is the default (i.e. without additional tricks) maximum RAM for a 1040ST. This great page tells about everything you never wanted to know about Atari ST using SIMM. How to ...


3

Your description make me think of Alpha Waves (a.k.a. "Continuum" outside of Europe) I had as a cover disk of a special issue of "ST Magazine" called "ST PC Disquette n°1" in France. Unfortunately I don't have the booklet anymore but I still have this floppy, which was playable on both ST and PC. Here's a Youtube video of the gameplay. Edit: the "ship" can ...


3

I think the game described is Rastan, a coin-op from Taito, later converted to several formats by Ocean Software, as is the case at hand. Rastan description in Wikipedia Kind regards.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible