32

How exactly did early computers like the Amiga, Atari ST and Macintosh handle the mouse while also carrying out demanding tasks? This was achieved by simply not low level handling the mouse. The Atari ST for example had a 6301 based keyboard controller handling keyboard and mouse (or joystick). The mouse is a simple bus mouse type sending a pair of phase ...


25

The (plain) 68k never had anything directly comparable to the Intel x86 range's Protected Mode. When Intel introduced the Protected mode (PM) to its x86 range of CPUs, this lifted a number of restrictions, though, that the 68k range never had: PM allowed the OS designer to protect (hence the name...) certain address ranges from access from non-privileged ...


25

As well as being the first colour Mac-like, the Atari ST was absurdly competitive on price, being the first mainstream 68000-based home computer. The Amiga wasn’t relaunched for the home market until 1987*. As a result it is the original home of a wealth of innovative game software — especially in Europe it was often the lead platform for games until the ...


24

The EHT (extra-high-tension) circuits used to drive colour CRT displays run at 25kV (kilo-volts), and the capacitors contain enough stored charge to kill you stone dead if you touch the wrong thing, and the stored charge does not disappear as soon as you switch the device off. I would take it to a repair shop if I were you. The technicians will have the ...


19

They are not really inductors. They are EMI noise filters for suppressing electromagnetic interference that conduct out of the unit via the wires. These kind of EMI filters usually have two ferrite beads and a capacitor in a T configuration, to filter both incoming and outgoing interference. The type of the filter is ZJS5101-02 according to ST manuals. ...


16

Looking for either "rose.neo" atari or "rose.pc1" atari in Google images with an exact requested size of 320x200 yields this result, which seems to match your description pretty well. Could it be that one? EDIT #1 Here is a better version from Demozoo. EDIT #2 The original Neochrome file can be downloaded from this page.


15

There are versions of the Atari 520ST, and perhaps the 1040ST, that differ in having many discrete inductors attached at the I/O port lines for serial, parallel and floppy ports. Essentially all later ST have them. The first picture shows a C070115 Rev. 2 ST board wich is about the oldest in general availability. The second is a C070243 Rev. C which is the ...


14

It's rather simple, the earliest mice were just outputting digital pulses from a quadrature encoder, and these pulses were not counted in software but hardware. How it basically works is that for each of the X and Y axes, there are two wires, which are basically digital sine and cosine waves of movement. So nothing like the paddle interfaces, which did not ...


13

How two 260ns RAM accesses could fit in 500ns? By using a 250ns (*1) tRC cycle? And yes, strictly that's out of spec. Still chances are very good that each and every chips will make it, as the timing range selected is rather conservative to start with. Even more so as this value is usually defined by the makers as being guarantied over the the whole ...


9

You may be referring to Barbarian and Barbarian II from game developer Psygnosis.


9

Tommy's answer mentioned it just "en passant": You could buy one of Atari’s laser printers plus the ST, and DTP software for quite a bit less than Apple’s LaserWriter alone. but that was indeed one innovation that was brought by the Atari: bare laser printer without own rendering controller, using the computer to replace it. A technique that came ...


9

Here is an unofficial port to the Amiga, known as "Heart of the alien Redux". To my knowledge it uses the original engine with the data of the SegaCD version. No idea how much work there was required to make it actually work, but I presume that the Sega CD engine is not that much different from the Amiga engine. http://www.indieretronews.com/2016/...


8

I'd say Zarch or as it was way more popular Virus. The game was originally conceived for the Acorn Archimedes, but soon ported to basically all platforms of the late 80s 16-bit era. There was a real hype. In fact, it was first distributed as a demo called 'Lander' with every new Archimedes computer, Making a really good case for buying one: Here are some ...


8

On both the Amiga and the Atari, external floppy drives don’t contain any “intelligence”, and the connectors are pin-to-pin. However the Amiga uses a 23-pin D connector whereas the Atari ST uses a 14-pin DIN connector, so the external drives aren’t directly compatible, and the drives themselves are setup differently. You could build a custom cable (with ...


8

The Open Source Scan Converter (OSSC) supports custom horizontal sample rates, even Amiga's PAL:Super-HiRes (1440×283) mode.


8

The SM124 is compatible with essentially all Atari ST - after all, the clean B&W video mode was one of the main selling points for the ST series - at least in Europe, were it had a strong stand as professional machine. The STE series does not differ from previous models in terms of video signal generated. All STE enhancements in video are in generation: ...


8

Here's a concrete example of Amiga low-level mouse reading from a programmer's perspective: As mentioned in other answers, the Amiga board handles counting X/Y mouse movement on its two joystick/mouse ports in hardware, not software. A cumulative 8-bit X and Y position is stored for each port and is updated as the quadrature pairs change for each axis due to ...


7

68000 had a protected mode as well (i.e. a special mode allowing the use of privileged/supervisor instructions not normally available to user code). Err, no. At least don't call it protected mode, call it supervisor mode or privileged mode. "Protected mode" implies something like the >=80286 protected mode which had hardware memory protection. This did not ...


7

So far as I recall, the Macintosh System Software didn't bother with the user versus supervisor mode distinction. Even after the release of System 7, which supported virtual memory, virtually everything ran in supervisor mode. I think the Apple Lisa, which had a more minicomputer-like (or what we'd today call Unix-like) operating system design, as well as ...


7

You are seeing dot crawl which is common when sending composite video into a low quality comb filter such as in that Video to VGA Converter box. To get rid of it, you will need a better comb filter (good ones are hard to find) or avoid composite entirely by converting from the STE's analog 15 kHz RGBHV to either the 31 kHz VGA that your monitor supports, or ...


7

Hint: It would be great if you could extend your question not only with the number of bombs, but as well the setup and conditions used to produce them. I understand bombs are sort of code indicator of what is malfunctioning in the system, Jup, they are, so it would be nice if you could tell how many you see, as that is essentially the error code. similar ...


7

I believe this might be "Under the Ice": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bmd-edm9pjw


7

If you want to look into early computers handling mice, you really need to take a peek at the Xerox Alto, developed in the early 1970s. It was the first computer designed with a mouse from the very beginning, and the first system to be built around the GUI. The mouse, as a device, had been invented earlier, and added onto existing equipment as a ...


6

Db is a debugger for the Atari ST and TT series of 68000-family computers... Db can use any of the ST's character devices for its input and output, including the screen, the serial port, and the MIDI port... Db is capable of debugging programs running on one machine while the bulk of the debugger runs on another. It lets you view the state of the ...


6

I'm virtually positive the game was Thunderstrike released in 1990 for the ST, Amiga, and DOS. The version I had was probably an early demo since I don't recall the various splash screens (besides the loading screen). The design of the loading screen, world and ships, the POV, as well as the gameplay are very close to what I recall and the ship selection ...


6

For the ST, the best option I’m aware of is to use the Atari-provided SCART cable and the OSSC; the latter will double lines etc. to produce a picture which any modern HDMI screen should be able to display. Depending on the outputs from your C64 (which may need to be modded anyway), the OSSC might not be appropriate; the RetroTINK 2X supports S-Video, ...


6

I can't find any info whatsoever. Most likely that's just a standard SCSI case (like Ross Ridge already assumed), notable due the existence of a terminator and an ACSI to SCSI cable (maybe even a homed made one). Being a rather standard drive it no hits may turn up in conjunction with Atari - in fact, there where zillions (almost) of shops that created ...


5

The Amiga and Atari ST were not compatible on either the floppy media format or on their floppy drives. The wiring is completely incompatible between the computer and the external floppy drives, most notably because the Amiga external floppy gets power from the computer and the ST external floppy has in built power supply. Also the Amiga disk format is based ...


5

Beyond the usual TOS compatibility issues which affected all Atari STs, the TT add the following twists: its faster CPU meant that some programs (games) ran too fast; this wasn’t as much of a problem as on the PC since most games used the vertical blank interrupt for timing; its 32-bit address bus meant that programs which used the top eight bits of ...


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