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1

The A bomb, the Amiga, with its custom chips-coprocessors, colourful graphics, stereo sound, pre-emptive multitasking OS and probably other stuff which I forget. I've never heard Amiga being called the "A bomb", especially as both the Atari and Mac would display bombs as error messages with Atari even showing mushroom clouds in the very early ...


2

The sad thing for me is that the ST's blitter chip didn't make it in time to be included on mass production as part of the base spec. I was fortunate to visit Atari during the early ST years and saw the blitter chip running on a prototype system. If they had included it from the start it would have been a very capable system at a price point that was ...


6

Tommy's answer mentioned it just "en passant": You could buy one of Atari’s laser printers plus the ST, and DTP software for quite a bit less than Apple’s LaserWriter alone. but that was indeed one innovation that was brought by the Atari: bare laser printer without own rendering controller, using the computer to replace it. A technique that came ...


1

The perception of 'new' is maybe an individual one as... Recalling the rise of 16bit era, defined mainly by Motorola 68k cpu computers When ignoring the TI 99/4 (and PC (*1)) that is. The Mac, brought the GUI interface. Not really. It was already on sale since 1981 by Xerox (and others) (*2) as well as offered in form of the Apple Lisa, which wasn't so ...


21

As well as being the first colour Mac-like, the Atari ST was absurdly competitive on price, being the first mainstream 68000-based home computer. The Amiga wasn’t relaunched for the home market until 1987*. As a result it is the original home of a wealth of innovative game software — especially in Europe it was often the lead platform for games until the ...


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