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2

I have Tiny BASIC 1 and 2 source code, for exactly the same reason you described (my own 8080-based computer). Here is a source code and a binary, ready to loaded from 01000h. Serial communication is provided by ACIA MC6850 - see lines 1420 - 1475, routines outc and chkio. ACIA is accessed via 0DEh (control/status register) and 0DFh (data register). So: Load ...


5

https://github.com/pkimpel/retro-b5500/blob/master/source/XBASIC/XBASIC.alg_m is a BASIC interpreter for the B5500, written in ALGOL, and dated 1975. This also mentions Burroughs's own BASIC, but a cursory search doesn't turn up a manual etc. so I can't ascribe a date to it. However ALL Burroughs system software was either written in ALGOL (this includes ...


3

The BASIC interpreter for the TI 99/4A computer is written in an intermediate language called GPL, which in turn runs natively on the TMS9900 microprocessor. See: http://www.nouspikel.com/ti99/titechpages.htm


9

BASIC for the MAI Basic Four minicomputer series was programmed in a version of TREE-META - a language for writing compilers in. I hesitate to call it a "high level language". TREE-META was more of a notation - very similar to BNF - with callouts to action routines. But it was not assembly language in any way. It was in fact an "attributed ...


9

Gordon Eubanks' BASIC-E for CP/M was written in PL/M around 1977. While PL/M is a fairly low-level systems programming language almost entirely targeting Intel processors, it's still higher level than directly targeting a specific processor in assembly language. BASIC-E compiles to an intermediate p-code, which is then interpreted by a separate runtime. So ...


1

Basis108 — an Apple II clone which came without basic ROMs but a basic on floppy. You had to load it before Apple DOS. KC85 and KC87 — Z80-based computers from the GDR, they booted from tape.


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