Hot answers tagged

21

Yes, they can deplete. More modern games (starting with the Nintendo 64, for instance) used EEPROM (similar to flash memory) so don't have this issue, but in the days of the SNES this was too expensive so battery-backed SRAM was used. How long the batteries last depends on the game. Pokemon Silver for example has a real-time clock, which takes a lot more ...


12

Disclaimer: This answer is not known to be accurate. From the information you've provided so far it's tricky to give complete advice, but here's a start: Removing corrosion The low CMOS battery error might be caused by battery leakage; from what I've seen of leaky batteries, they do appear rusty. This can cause significant damage to components. To ...


8

Ni-Cd cells like the ones used in the last century have one strong advantage over the Li-based battery cells we use today: They simply die silently. As long as they are not leaking and contaminate the inwards of your computer, I see no reason why you shouldn't just go on using that computer. Other than that, quite a lot of Ni-Cd battery packs have been ...


8

Don't wait, just clip it. Come back when you're done. You look dangerously close to getting the goop on the motherboard which is effectively malignant cancer for electronics. Now that you've clipped the battery, you need to decide on what replacement you want to use. Unfortunately, the Amigas originally came with NiCd batteries which despite being prone to ...


7

On all my retro computers, I tend to replace the on-board batteries with cables and a double AA battery holder like this that I can store off-PCB (typically, I fix it somewhere within the computer using double-sided tape) to make sure leaking batteries can never again damage the PCB. Normal AAs by far won't last as long as the original or Li-Ion batteries, ...


7

wizzwizz4 has a good answer about cleaning up the corrosive chemicals to stop the damage getting any worse, so I won't duplicate that information. But here are a few more suggestions. My experience is with the Amiga computers, where the retro computer enthusiasts speak of Varta with howls of anguish - the damage you have seen here has affected thousands of ...


6

The battery probably isn't a part of the power-filtering system. If you aren't sure if you'll be able to use the laptop without it, just disassemble the laptop, remove the battery and power on the computer. If it works, then there's nothing to be worried about. If it doesn't, firstly check if you have connected everything properly; If everything seems OK, ...


5

Restoring to an as-new look is likely not possible with the damage described. Most western PCBs used for computers use solder mask (the green stuff) over the traces - if corrosion happened UNDER the solder mask, you would probably need to remove all the solder mask before treating the traces itself. Solder mask is available as a canned product for manual ...


4

What is stored in the IIgs PRAM? Basicly everything you can set via the Control Panel I'm going to replace my PRAM battery in a ROM 03 IIgs and that got me thinking about what is stored in PRAM. I know that date and time are stored, but not if all the same values are stored on the IIgs as on the Macintosh. It's much like the Mac. In addition to things ...


4

I have 3 of these laptops, and can assure you that they will run OK without the NiCd battery installed, although you may need to replace the lithium CMOS battery if that hasn't been replaced. You can get a matching CMOS battery from Amazon, but you'll need to swap the connectors. Search for ER6C 3.6v Lithium. You should find a few AA size that say they're ...


4

The fluid leaking from the battery has likely spread out across the board in a general radius away from the battery. In photo 1 you can see the exposed copper trace above the slots is corroded at least 10cm to the left of the battery. The controller card itself shows damage to the full length of the edge connector, so likely all the adjacent unused slot ...


4

You can replace with alkaline batteries, but will need a diode to prevent them being charged. Charging alkaline batteries, even very slowly, is risky and can cause them to leak. If the original battery is a 3.6V lithium cell. You could replace it with 3x NiMH cells which are 1.2V nominal each, and would be charged by the machine just fine. Use Eneloop or ...


4

iFixit has a (user-contributed) guide on this subject. The Zire battery appears to be a standard 3.7volt 600mAh Lithium-Ion unit, probably originating from cell phones. Amazon shows several non-OEM replacements available.


3

The PRAM battery for a Titanium Powerbook G4 is rechargeable, it might not need replacing (though will certainly go flat on the shelf). The cells are rechargeable lithium/vanadium pentoxide 3V coin cells, similar to Panasonic VL2020, in a plastic (tape?) wrap, with pigtail connection. Hold down command-option-P-R at startup to reinitialize PRAM contents; ...


2

Even if the battery powered memory loses its contents, you don't really risk losing the ability to boot. The settings that are stored in the memory for the on-board SCSI controller are all performance-related, if the battery data is lost they would all revert to their defaults, that are (appropriately) the more conservative choice. The only non-...


2

You might be able to find the precise dimensions in the Developer Note that came out around the time of the release; this is what would also have pinouts and specs for RAM expansion and so on. You'll need to do a little more than just repackage some modern cells and get the right voltage and wattage, however: The PowerBook will try to charge the battery ...


2

If the board does not have an external battery connector, you can try connecting an external battery pack (for example, a 3 x AA holder containing alkaline batteries) to the original internal connector. The positive lead should be connected through a diode to stop the motherboard attempting to charge the battery. This thread on the Vintage Computer Forum is ...


1

According to https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/comp.sys.apple2/3mh5_J2Zl0U yes, you can...but I'd urge caution and would use a protection diode anyway. Or even better, go for the specific product - if a diode is required, it should be included. I'd be going for whatever provides the voltage and current over it's life as close to the original spec as ...


1

It is not uncommon to find a 4-pin battery connector on an AT-compatible motherboard, even if the board had a rechargeable battery on-board. Such boards would also usually have a jumper to enable/disable the battery charging circuit. If you connect a battery to the 4-pin connector you would normally disable the battery charging circuit since those ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible