Hot answers tagged

10

Well, a few users are creating compilation of games for the CD32 and the CDTV. The most prolific is AmigaJay. For instance here he released several compilations for CDTV including a lot of titles: Volume 1 Volume 2 Volume 3 Volume 4 Volume 5 Volume 6 Basically, the compilations boot with a menu (AGS or other) then run scripts to assign volumes and boot ...


10

Thanks to RichF's answer I looked for information specifically on booting OS-9 and found that you definitely did have to manually launch even an alternative operating system. From OS-9 Level Two Operating System page 2-2, "Booting OS-9": However, this DOS is not a filename and this is not how you load or run any other program. These are the normal ways: ...


7

Hint: It would be great if you could extend your question not only with the number of bombs, but as well the setup and conditions used to produce them. I understand bombs are sort of code indicator of what is malfunctioning in the system, Jup, they are, so it would be nice if you could tell how many you see, as that is essentially the error code. similar ...


7

In order to autoboot any Amiga hard disk, 3 things are needed. A version of Kickstart that supports boot from HD. This means >= Kickstart 1.3. A device driver that knows how to speak to the HD controller, such as scsi.device. A filesystem handler that understands the format of the HD. I think #1 is simple to understand. This is a function of the Strap (as ...


6

The 128K mode retains the "old" cursor key combinations - in particular, CAPS Shift 6 stands for cursor down, CAPS Shift 7 for cursor up.


6

Press: Ctrl+Reset This should get you to the Applesoft BASIC prompt, with a checkerboard cursor: ]▩ If you don't see that then something is wrong. Otherwise you can check your ROM version: ]?PEEK(64447) 255 ]▩ ROM version 255 can supposedly boot the external drive (though I've never tried this personally) but some disks might not boot correctly. You ...


5

IIRC there was no need to boot the operating system. It was in the ROM as part of the machine's BASIC. There were actually two choices, with Extended Color Basic being in the more advanced machines. A disk would simply provide access to files, sort of like a fast, random access tape. There was at least one alternative operating system which would load ...


5

Check the MBR record. Did you use the "fdisk /MBR" command? Some of those cards do not support the CHS mode (Cylinder / Head / Sector), especially the larger ones. Try the smaller card. Check if the BIOS supports the LBA mode. Some older BIOSes can't... Generally, booting from the hard disk (or CF in this case) perform reading MBR from the very first sector ...


5

It looks I got lucky, otherwise it would have been a long road. Apparently this laptop has a ROM-DOS on board in the socket. Due to bad contact it was not detected at startup. After I reinserted flash chip into the socket, it detected it and booted from ROM to DOS 3.3. It only had FDISK among useful tools there, but that was enough. It appeared, that BIOS ...


5

My hypothesis is as follows: The last time you successfully formatted the drive to be bootable, you did it with something that only understands FAT16 booting, so it installed a boot sector that only knows how to hand off to FAT16 partitions. When you formatted for FAT32, you didn't properly ask for a bootable FAT32 partition, so you've got a boot sector ...


4

Purposely registered here to let know. Sadly can't comment due to the 50 reputation limit Traditionally, the solution provided by Aoresteen is the best. Unfortunately, rloew has passed away in September 2019. Rest in peace The full version of his patch is now available for free, here


4

Simply press RESET (depending on model and setting you might have to hold down CTRL or Open-Apple+CTRL before pressing RESET). This will bring you into default APPLESOFT BASIC. Just, BASIC does not contain any disk commands - unless DOS is loaded from floppy - which pressing Reset will abort :) The only function available is to boot from a controller by ...


4

Emulators should emulate the Disk ][ hardware at a low level, or they're going to have a bad time. Attempting to pull in the right set of sectors will work for standard DOS or ProDOS disks, but won't work for anything custom. You can find a commented disassembly of the boot ROM here and a "typical" T0/S0 here. You'll note there's a sector ...


4

From my answer to How do I know where the file directory is stored on a Spectrum +3 disk layout? Part 26 of the +3 manual is what you need to read. There is even a complete example of how to write boot code and how to store it into the disk. This part is the relevant one regarding which values the disk specification block must have: bootstart: ; ;The ...


3

This is a little tricky to answer, because only about 30% of a DOS 3.3 boot sector is actually boot code. The BOOT0 ROM has everything needed to read a sector from track 0, so BOOT1 (T0/S0) just needs to call it with physical sector numbers and buffer addresses to load the full RWTS. The DOS INIT command needs a T0/S0 image handy when formatting a disk, so ...


3

I think some of the answers here are combining determining the disk format with detecting if it's bootable. I've answered how the format is detected on its own question, so here I'll concentrate on the boot process. The +3 tries to boot from a disc by using the DOS_BOOT function. This selects drive A:, closes any open files on it, and then tries to read ...


3

I think you did a good job of providing relevant details. For instance, the fact that the same image works on a newer machine does indicate that the critical "system files" (IO.SYS and MSDOS.SYS and perhaps the command interpreter, typically COMMAND.COM) may all be in the right locations on the disk (referring to disk sectors, not just filesystem hierarchy)....


3

Out of all the things I tried, what ended up working was: Copy Windows 98 set up files to the CF card. Let windows do it's thing, and boom, it booted from the CF card.


3

I've run into that issue before. Try a smaller card. Some systems do not like to boot off of cards greater than 16 GB. Some 32 GB...


3

Another idea could be to dump some Kickstart ROM to a file, then either add a new Resident module if there is space available in the image, or overwrite a non-essential one (audio.device comes to mind, see below), with a custom module that calls Debug() on Exec (You could use the module's Init function to do this). Then you burn your new ROM to an EPROM and ...


2

One possibility is that because there’s no keyboard attached, it’s coming up with serial console only. Attach a terminal to the console serial port and see if you get anything on boot. You’ll need to set it to the standard 9600/8/N/1 and may need to use a null modem cable.


2

What emulator are you using? Spectrum +, +2 and +3 have additional cursor keys along the bottom row of the keyboard beside the space bar. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/ca/ZX_Spectrum%2B.jpg/1024px-ZX_Spectrum%2B.jpg The ⬆️⬇️ keys are used to navigate the boot menu. I suspect that your emulator isn't set up to emulate the Spectrum+...


2

On a CPC system, you can determine if the disc is in System format (i.e. bootable) by the number of the first physical sector. If the sector is 41h, the disc is in System format, with 2 reserved boot sectors, whereas C1h means Data format, no reserved sectors. The PCW and Spectrum +3 can also determine the bootability of a disc from a 16-byte record on ...


1

After Googling this for an hour or two and not finding much, I have found something solid just minutes after posting my question! From page 40 of TRS8BIT volume 09 issue 02 from June 2015 there is an article on a "FreHD Expansion Interface" which includes this paragraph: If a WDC1771 Disc Controller is found then the LII ROM programs the chip to ...


1

But since this [boot] block is optional, there must be a way for the system to detect whether it's present or not. There isn't. The +3 (like the Amstrad CPC) doesn't autoboot. Using the Loader on a +3 (or |CPM on an Amstrad CPC) on a disk that's in Data or Vendor format (that is, does not have CP/M or custom boot code in the reserved tracks already ...


1

I think you did a good job of providing relevant details. For instance, the fact that the same image works on a newer machine does indicate that the critical "system files" (IO.SYS and MSDOS.SYS and perhaps the command interpreter, typically COMMAND.COM) may all be in the right locations on the disk (referring to disk sectors, not just filesystem hierarchy). ...


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