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135

Turbo Pascal programs start by calibrating a delay loop (so that the Delay function knows how much to spin to achieve a certain delay). The calibration counts the number of times a certain loop is run for 55ms (as measurable using the PC’s timer interrupt with its default setting), then divides the number of loops by 55 so that Delay can then busy-wait in ...


27

I think it’s worth looking at the rise of Turbo Pascal (in particular) to understand its “downfall”. When Turbo Pascal was released, it has a number of advantages over the competition, regardless of programming language: it was fast, it produced (reasonably) fast programs, it came with excellent documentation, it included a full development environment with ...


14

Delphi 1.0 was released Feb 14, 1995. By my (now somewhat foggy) recollection, research / experimentation that directly contributed to defining the Delphi visual development experience started around 1992. The research group included some folks who had previously worked at Xerox Parc Place on human-machine interface design and theory, as well as the Turbo ...


11

I don't think the answer is very complicated, but the scope and time-frame of the transition was much bigger than you indicate. This wasn't so much about what was happening in DOS/PC programming as it was about the slow but steady unification of scientific computing and mainstream/business computing. The C Language, along with the Unix OS, grew to dominate ...


6

Somewhat obscure but IDA Pro for DOS was using Turbo Vision Later the same TUI got ported to OS/2, Win32 console and Linux terminal and at one point even iPhone! The TVision version is still shipped today for Win32, Linux and macOS together with the default Qt GUI. Updated cross-platform TVision library source code is available for download.


6

I suspect it was, at least in part, due to the offerings from Microsoft getting a lot better. MFC was launched in 1992, I believe, and that, combined with C++, made a huge difference in productivity, compared to the painful old world of C and Windows API. Also, Visual Basic arrived in 1991, although it was widely available before then in beta, and that made ...


5

The singular problem with Pascal in contrast to C was that C is a much more generic language than Pascal with a more flexible typing system. In Pascal, notably, I/O is a first class concept, with direct, and "special", support in the language. The original Pascal typing system wasn't flexible enough to handle outliers such the I/O system which need to ...


4

You have to appreciate that the vast bulk of software written in the world never sees the light of day outside of the business that created it. There are millions of programmers worldwide working every day on applications, yet we as the public see a small fraction of those applications. Most of the code is line of business back office work, software used for ...


3

One factor leading to the downfall of Pascal is that even though the major Pascal vendors on the PC and Macintosh both extended Wirth's language in similar ways, there was never any kind of "official" standard. By contrast, a document was published around 1989 which called itself an official standard for C, even though its quality as a "standard" (a ...


2

I don’t remember any major non-Borland software written using Turbo Vision either. I suspect that if there had been, it would have been listed in part 3 of the Turbo Vision FAQ, “Applications written with Turbo Vision”.


1

Pascal was the implementation language for the Accent operating system and, for most of the user-mode software that ran on PERQ workstations in the 1980s. Except... ...It wasn't Pascal, it was PERQ Pascal which was enhanced in ways that made it significantly more friendly to software developers, while possibly making it harder for computer science profs to ...


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