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3

I guess some emulators have a direct MIC input for a quick check, but I prefer a little bit longer way. First of all, I connect the tape with the PC (in fact, I have a "USB Walkman") and make a digital copy using Audacity, at the best quality I can (48 kHz sampling frequency, 16 or 24 bits). Save it as lossless WAV (NO MP3!) With this record, I can do all ...


3

Not sure if VHS counts as a cassette storage, but ArVid did use ECC (Hamming in older models, Reed-Solomon in later models).


8

Due to the nature of typical errors, simpler ECCs, like Hamming, would be of no use, and more complex ECCs would be prohibitively expensive. For example, a burst of noise will corrupt several bits in a row, and if we're unlucky, and depending on the encoding mechanism, the synchronization may be lost, thus rendering all bits up to the end of a block or the ...


2

The Oric Atmos (not the Oric 1) had some kind of error detection (that was broken in the first version of the Atmos ROM) which printed "errors found" (without any further details) when loading encountered an issue. It wasn't based on a checksum, but rather on detecting a proper read of each byte of the tape (if it was using parity, it's at the hardware level)...


9

Use of error-correcting codes was not common in home computers until at least 33.6Kbps modems and/or gigabyte-sized hard disks were available. One of the earliest consumer applications of ECC (in the form of two-dimensional Reed-Solomon codes) was the Compact Disc. Until then, error-detecting codes such as parity and CRC were reasonably common, including ...


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