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109

When CD-ROM games were first introduced, game developers didn’t take any measures to prevent users from copying them, for two main reasons: CD-ROMs could contain more data than most hard drives at the time; CD writers were rare, and extremely expensive. The Wikipedia page on CD-R gives some idea of the expense involved: in 1990, CD recording systems cost ...


46

We had some software delivered on a CD in which the vendor purposely put a defect on a specific track. If that defect wasn't there, the software could say it wasn't an original CD. Since defects are not copied, even on low level track copies, an exact replica could not be created.


23

(preface: While Stephen's answer already covers the basic points, I would like to put a different emphasis here - and merge in some private history :)) Short answer: It was the game's size and the need to copy it to a CD again, combined with expensive and unreliable writers. Further, the CD itself was used as a copy protection. While games often got ...


17

It appears that the CD-ROM doesn't have a valid ISO 9660 file system. ISO 9660 requires that the file names be entirely in uppercase, lower case characters in file names aren't allowed. The directory listing in your screenshot shows only file names with lowercase letters instead of only uppercase as you'd expect to see in a MS-DOS directory listing. The ...


15

Just a disclaimer: Most of this is based on observation and assumptions from experience and should be taken with a grain of salt. From what I've seen with this glitch, the audio being played is actually just a very stretched out version of the chimes that play over the second logo which you see when a disc is loaded, rather than a separate sample. Judging ...


13

It's probably not exact but Sony back in the day had a really cool way of Protection against pirates: Simply said they changed the CD itself... and made it "Wobble" in a certain way in the beginning so the reader knew it's an OEM Disk.


11

In addition to Stephen Kitt's answer: Copy protection existed long before CDs; most of these techniques could be applied to CD-ROMs too. Many games that were shipped on floppies had copy protection - sometimes a question in the beginning that asked you to look at the booklet it came with, Monkey Island had a disk with 2 parts that you needed to set ...


10

A stock Amiga 500 doesn't come with any expansion port that would take a standard CD ROM drive (or hard disk) directly. Storage extension is limited to external floppy drives. The option of the day was to obtain an A570 1, a rather bulky interface that fitted to the A500 expansion port, which contained quite a bit of circuitry (DMA, ROMs containing the new ...


9

Hardware-wise, you can get HiSoft's Surf Squirrel PCMCIA-to-SCSI adapter and attach an external SCSI CD-ROM drive. For this, you don't need to open up the A1200, but then you can't use the PCMCIA for a network card at the same time. Note the following caveat: The surf squirrel does not support auto-booting from a cold boot (power cycle) however drivers can ...


8

A quick review of the games consoles suggests that the Saturn and PlayStation were the first to implement copy protection as a firmware-level feature; between the 3DO, Mega CD and PC Engine there are some measures to ensure games are from licensed developers but no built-in protection against copies. I was also unable to find any evidence of software for ...


7

From your pictures you have a CD-ROM manufactured by Matsushita for IBM with a model number of CR-563BBZ. This drive uses Matsushita's proprietary interface, so won't work with the the OAKCDROM.SYS driver which only supports CD-ROM drives using the IDE interface. It is however not connected to your sound card, its connected to it's own LaserMate CD-ROM ...


5

Besides the measures against copying the CD-ROM there were other things. Pretty popular were dongles: specific hardware devices put one the parallel port. The game (or other software) did not run without those dongles. The dongles could not be copied easily.


5

Firstly, many old computers had problems with booting from CD; It was either unsupported or very buggy. Secondly, even if booting from CD would work on that particular Aptiva, i doubt that booting from a recorded CD would - it has something to do with the way data is written to the disc (many pre-1997 (the year recordable CDs were introduced) CD-ROMs have ...


4

Due to the nature of optical media, the answer is probably whatever format lets you play the game as close as possible to how the original was. Optical media can have many "out of band" features, that is things that are not part of the raw data stream encoded on the disk. Often they can only be read by specific drives, and in some cases only the special ...


3

Check the format your CD writing software is producing; these days there are two major formats, UDF and ISO9660/Joliet. Versions of Windows older than Windows 98 SE, however, only understands ISO9660 or Joliet so would be unable to read a UDF-formatted disc. If your Win98 is not SE, or if your writer software is using more recent extensions to the UDF ...


3

There's reason to believe that this is a qemu bug (actually a problem caused by the configuration of SeaBIOS in qemu 3.0 and 3.1). If this is the case, the CD driver will work fine in qemu 2.12.1 or older (SeaBIOS will be 1.11.1 or older), or qemu 4.0.0 or newer (SeaBIOS will be 1.12.1 or newer). A qemu displaying a SeaBIOS version of 1.11.2 or 1.12.0 will ...


2

Here's a list of things you could try to narrow down the scope of your problem : reset the BIOS of your PC and your SCSI card to default settings remove all components except necessary ones to preform your test try update the firmware of your PC, SCSI adapter and HDD (might be difficult for the latter) try to change the slot were your SCSI adapter is ...


1

From what I remember - most successful was the Serial Number approach when every CD copy had a unique hash to verify the unit copy. Verification process would request a hash to validate the copy and flag it useable. Serial number was included as a sticker inside the CD package.


1

I was successfully using a generic IDE CD-ROM with Amiga for many years. You connect it to the same IDE ribbon you use for a hard disk from the motherboard - the only fancy hardware is the 2.5" to 3.5" connector you need for the harddisk anyway - and some power for your CD-ROM, e.g. an external PSU. You still use scsi.device with that setup (regardless of ...


1

This is only a partial answer. You can get SCSI<>IDE adapters on eBay. The Amiga 4000 and 1200 have IDE controllers built in. Earlier Amigas have SCSI. You will also need CD drivers.


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