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1

If you restrict your use of BASIC to statements and commands and functions that exist in version 2.0, with no memory-address references (so no POKE, PEEK, SYS, USR, or WAIT), and keep the program small enough to fit into the unexpanded VIC-20's 3583 bytes (including space taken up by variable values during the course of the program's execution), you can ...


1

There are three ways an attempt to load a tape can fail: The loader reports success, but the data is incorrect. The loader reports failure and does not read correct data. The loader reports failure, but in fact loads the data correctly anyhow. Commodore's tape system does a very good job of preventing failure #1. Unfortunately, it writes two complete ...


3

The datassette doesn't have the bias circuit on recording, because on digital data wasn't necessary, and also has sensors that informed if the motor was engaged. Also the power supply was from the computer so no batteries or extra plugs were involved. On the reproducing part a circuit designed to process a digital signal doesn't introduces unnecessary stages ...


18

The Datassette has a digital interface, and since it is not meant to process audio signals at all, it allows directly writing sharp digital magnetic transitions to the tape, using a single monophonic read/write head. The written pulses are always written at same amplitude, so there is no variation between equipment. Also when reading the transitions off the ...


3

I believe the datasette had the ADC built in, so it could then transmit digital signals to the computer. By optimising for digital output, the unit should have been more reliable, compared to a conventional tape player which would have bias settings for a more accurate output of analogue sound data.


2

Retrograde's suggestion is most likely the cause... On the video it looks like the sound comes from LCD so my bet its the high voltage supply in the link of yous its called BACKLIGHT POWER INVERTER MODULE: There are many possible reasons for this like: failing caps (electrolytes) of switching power supply / inverter I see two on the image the black tall ...


3

It sounds a bit like "coil whine", i.e. high frequency vibrations in a transformer or coil caused by fluctuation in the magnetic field they maintain. That in itself does not necessarily indicate a failure, but sometimes you can hear this type of sound from switchers straining to maintain the desired output voltage, maybe due to some component ...


2

What I've heard from people who should know, is that it's simply a form of error checking, not error correction. The data is always read twice, but the second time it simply checks that the data read from the tape is what is already in RAM. Most other systems, even at that time, used a CRC to do the same job more efficiently. Of course, you can ...


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