New answers tagged

2

There have been several attempts on things like this. For the Amiga there are for example: Re-Amiga http://wordpress.hertell.nu/?p=587 A4000TX http://www.amibay.com/showthread.php?101477-A4000TX-ATX-Amiga-motherboard And there were older examples as well, some of which got lost in time. There are also examples for IBM PCs, sometimes designed from scratch, ...


5

DAC is a digital analog converter. There is no such periphery on C64, but the closest to it is the SID chip, for playing sound. Also the SID chip was not designed for that. It can play ADSR (attack-decay-sustain-release) sounds with 4 pre-configured waveforms: This can be hacked to work like a DAC. It can only 16 signal levels, but it is enough to produce ...


4

The dongle for the PaperClip word processor plugged into joystick port 1. It read bits 0 and 1 from the dongle and wrote bits 2, 3 and 4 to control it. Keyboard interference probably wasn't an issue with this use case.


13

[Insert: Some site history While the German subsidary (Commodore Büromaschinen GmbH), originally set in Neu-Isenburg near Frankfurt, had facilities for import handling and distribution, this was soon moved to a distribution center in Braunschweig and accomplished by a final assembly line and a development center. At the same time the company moved into ...


4

I'd say you're a bit out of luck with your objective, unfortunately. I'll focus on the C64, which is the only Commodore machine I programmed regularly, but it's probably quite similar on other machines using PETSCII as well: The PETSCII encoding is a variation of ASCII, this is used by the builtin operating system for text. But at least the C64 has fonts in ...


2

How do assembly-language programs on Commodore systems commonly deal with text? Is "text mode" the dominant form? Assuming that you mean screen encoding by "text mode": If the programmer wants to put the text on screen by copying the string from memory, screen codes is the prefered storage method, since no conversion is necessary during the copy routine. ...


4

Most text is shown in text mode, as opposed to being drawn in bitmap mode. Yes, programs can very easily use more than one encoding. PETSCII is what the OS APIs all use, including the ones to print things to the screen, but when actually printing to the screen it is converted to screen codes. Some software might decide to forgo the OS APIs and print to the ...


4

There were several cards, in the mid 1980s, based on use of 64 KiB. Except that it was usually not to use full 64 Kib, but to get RAM at the right location some (game) program wanted it. For example this page shows three different boards of that time frame. The main issue with RAM in the VIC20 is less the amount of RAM, than that its use swaps around, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included