16

I don't recall any mass-market commercial software for the Spectrum using the term "decrunching" - I'd associate that more with the demo and cracking scenes of central and eastern Europe, and my guess is that the software you saw originated from there. Around the early 1990s there were a few compression tools in use in that community, and while ...


9

As far as I know, there were two main approaches to compress the data. The first one, more common, was to load the whole code and "de-crunch" it. It uses RLE or simple vocabulary algorithm (LZ-like). RLE was pretty common to compress screen (there is a lot of zero sequences in many cases). The second one, less common, performs decompression during ...


8

As time goes by, CPU power becomes cheaper and more plentiful, to the point where it makes sense to start spending some of it using more complex storage formats that save disk space and bandwidth, and indeed modern databases can do this. Oh, the situation was rather the other way around. There was never enough disk space. If one got to store several tables ...


7

I wrote the compression routine use by the Multiface on the Spectrum and Amstrad machines. It was a plug in unit that would save all memory to tape and allow you to continue your game where you left off. Not at all to be used for piracy of course. I asked the makers, Romantic Robot, if it did any compression or just saved masses of zeros for a 16k game. It ...


1

For what it's worth, "decrunching" (and the opposite, crunching) appears to be a relatively common slang term for decompression on load on from the time when these systems were popular and is even still used in the current retrocomputing scene (see, for example, this demo from 2015. The Wikipedia page for Amiga Software mentions it as having ...


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