13

Unfortunately, you can't connect two floppy drives to the motherboard header on that system. Like most motherboards since sometime around 2002–2003, it only supports one floppy drive, probably because its I/O is implemented using a low-pin-count SuperIO chip with too few pins to drive two floppy drives. The fact that your BIOS setup only mentions one floppy ...


10

The very short answer is no, because no “green screen” standard is compatible with VGA (which is where 640×480 was introduced). The slightly longer answer is yes, but only in a very small number of situations. The important aspect here is the signal sent from whatever system is driving the display, to the display. Early display adapters (apart from those ...


9

Black-and-white hi-res from the 1040 STE on a VGA monitor should work with a direct connection and no tricky electronics at all (just the adapter cable) Atari VGA GND 13----X---- GND ---------4 GND Sense 4----+ +--------------2 green ...


8

The problem you have is that most home computers of that era output TV standard signals which VGA is not. As you've mentioned there needs to be some conversion from one standard to the other. A popular solution that I happen to use is the Gonbes GBS-8200/GBS-8220 boards. They aren't perfect and some people hate them but they are reasonably cheap and I think ...


8

On modern motherboards, the floppy is controlled by the Super I/O chip, and often this chip is only capable of controlling one floppy drive, because the additional drive select/moter pins are not present by design. I have a similar problem: My motherboard has a Nuvoton NCT6776F Super I/O chip, and that can work with one floppy only. I am thinking of ...


7

You have three problems to overcome: Separate sync from composite video or CSYNC into H and V to get an RGBHV output. Upscale/scan double from 15 kHz to the 31 kHz that most VGA monitors accept. Separate out the audio. The $89 Ambery 15Khz RGB CGA to VGA RGBHV Converter Scaler is a device that appears to do the first two, but I have no experience with it. ...


5

SCART is a connector standard, not a video standard. I think it can carry composite, s-videos (chroma/luma), analog RGB, audio and possible other formats depending on what is producing the signal. So there isn't a one size fits all to 'convert' SCART to VGA. However, without checking, if memory serves, I think the 1040 produces analog RGB, so if the ...


4

For my STE, I go straight from RGB to VGA using: An ST RGB SCART cable (this one) A sync stripper (Sync Strike) An LCD monitor that accepts 15kHz VGA (BenQ RL2455HM) This is a clean solution without the need for scan convertors / line doublers and provides a razor sharp picture


4

Another possibility would be to use a cheap USB video capture device, such as this one. (You'll also need a SCART to composite video adapter, which you can buy or wire up yourself). Connect the video oputput of your Atari (or whatever you have) to the USB video capture device, the USB capture device to a modern PC, and then you can see the video output on ...


3

Back in the day, it was VERY common to encounter an IBM compatible which had only a single floppy drive, invariably designated as drive A. Do you imagine it phased us? :) The solution was dead easy. You inserted the floppy in drive A and issued the DOS command COPY A: B: which resulted in the system prompting the user to swap disks. It read disk 1 from A:,...


3

Well, 'Television' is just a modulated TV signal on chanel 2 or 3 (see switch) which can be decoded by any analogue TV. A cinch (coaxial) cable to connect the computer to the antena input of the TV is all that's needed. The DIN connector carries more detailed signals like: (clockwise starting from the right) Luminance Composite Video Ground Chroma Audio (...


3

They could be interchanged if you define "some effort" as "a lot of effort". The problem isn't so much the CRT tubes themselves, or the choice of 'color' or 'monochrome', but rather the circuitry that drives the electron beam deflection electromagnets, and the power supplies needed to drive those circuits. These circuits are built to sweep the electron gun ...


3

Those cables you're looking at have exactly the right number of pins for GPIB; your issue is that the arm doesn't use GPIB, at least not the arm's connectors used to interface it to a computer. The following information is taken from this copy of the manual that I found on archive.org. The 36-pin micro-ribbon connector is a standard Centronics parallel ...


2

[...]Media Vision Pro AudioSpectrum 16 Patch Panel [...] it appears that this panel was used to interface with the sound card of the same name in old Apple computers [...] The function is clear for every port on it except this one, which is on the side and appears to be intended to connect to the computer itself. Not the computer but the sound card. ...


2

In 1985 I paid $50 for a parallel printer adapter for my Atari 800xl to connect it to a standard Canon printer. The most popular one at the time called an ape face was around $60. The Atari 850 interface which was both serial and parallel was coming down in price but was still over $100. The 1050 disk drive was around $180 while the non Atari drives that ...


2

It can be done, but in addition to connectors, there are three signal issues. First, the refresh rate can be inflexible (and if it's different, there may be inadequate adjustment capability). Second, the horizontal and vertical synchronization signals may be of different types (polarity, duty cycle). Third, the video voltage levels and drive impedance ...


1

I guess (is that allowed as an answer?) that these are bus terminating resistors. High speed signals are usually passed along impedance matched transmission lines, the termination resistor mostly removes any reflections from an unused port.


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