5

I think possibly your emulator is fooling you. Per this FUSE feature request, leading to this patch in particular and this commit, FUSE synthesises a boot.b and adds it to the disk directory if you open a disk that does not otherwise have one. So the reason that you can't locate the file within the disk image is that it isn't there. The emulator is ...


5

The IPL binary they're referring to is what's more commonly called the ROM "boot code", and it exists in every Nintendo 64 cartridge. Despite containing ordinary mask ROMs, in practice N64 cartridges work more like disk drives. The CPU doesn't execute code in the cartridge ROMs directly, instead the N64 firmware loads the first 4096 bytes of the ROM into ...


4

The best copy protection is called “marching bits”. The transition is place at the window margin by using a write clock speed 10x faster than the actual playback clock on the floppy controller. This way each bit is actually written as 10 bits and allows for a production product accurate within a 25% window. Note floppy discs drives vary between units and ...


2

I remember copying games on my ZX Spectrum 48k (one of clones). First, most games were already cracked (like "Cracked by Bill Gilbert"), so there usually were no copy protection. The copies were actually made with the help of tape copying programs. They would load blocks into memory and then, after the cassete changed, replay everything back. I remember ...


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