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I remember copying games on my ZX Spectrum 48k (one of clones). First, most games were already cracked (like "Cracked by Bill Gilbert"), so there usually were no copy protection. The copies were actually made with the help of tape copying programs. They would load blocks into memory and then, after the cassete changed, replay everything back. I remember ...


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The Commodore 64 was somewhat unusual in that off-the-shelf tape recorders didn't work with it, so you were forced to use the Commodore Datasette unit or later clones thereof. Also tapes copied in a normal twin-deck machine wouldn't load using the Datasette. One solution was a hardware device that plugged into the cassette port and to which two Datasettes ...


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I had an Amstrad 464, which has an internal tape deck. It was quite common to copy tapes using a twin tape deck. Most portable 'ghetto blasters' in the mid 80s had two decks. Normally only one could record. Some even had a fast copy mode where both would run at double speed. Game copies would usually work for the first couple of generations, but then would ...


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