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10

I did find some prices in BYTE: November 1975, page 91 2107 4Kx1 Dynamic: $19.95 (0.49 cents/byte) 2111 256x4 Static: -- not listed 1101 256x1 Static: $2.25 (0.89 cents/byte) April 1976, page 89 2107 4Kx1 Dynamic: $19.95 (0.49 cents/byte) 2111 256x4 Static: $7.95 (0.77 cents/byte) 1101 256x1 Static: $2.25 (0.89 cents/byte) Byte ...


7

My firm designed microcomputer boards in the late 1970s to early 1980s, and we often had discussions about whether a particular design was going to use static or dynamic RAM. When you say "static RAM, because it's quite a bit easier to get to work", you also need to remember that the refresh circuits cost design time, chips, and board space. (No surface-...


6

Most PDP-series machines of this era were built using a large number of cards (with soldered components) connected by a wire-wrap backplane and a series of cables. I think the cables were mostly used to interface major components together, such as the CPU to the RAM, storage drives, terminal multiplexers, etc. The cards were considered standard components ...


6

In this document there is a mentioning of half a million dollars spent for designing the Z80.


5

The Vic20 was not the last consumer product to use static ram on the main system board. In the mid 90's a Socket 3 (486 class) motherboard was created by Ocean Technology octek.com - defunct. The HIPPO-DCA2 motherboard which required at least one 4MB 72-pin SIMM of something called DynamiCache RAM in the first 2 slots. DynamiCache was a built from high ...


4

Using the many helpful comments given, and reviewing dealer pricing of the Apple II and II Plus in old issues of Byte magazine from 1979/80, I've come up with what I think is a reasonable explanation and timeline. The most important factor affecting the price of both Apple II models during the transition period of late 1979 and 1980 was the rapid decline in ...


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