63

When colour television broadcasts began (1960s, in the UK; perhaps a little earlier in North America?) there weren't any local devices that customers might want to use. Broadcast TV was the only source of images that any home user could imagine. Adding extra circuitry to handle separated R, G, B and sync inputs (with appropriate protections against overload ...


21

Early colour TVs predated VCRs and home computers by many years. Even if it did not cost much, adding an RGB input would still be a cost for something that no one would use. However, it would have been more complex and expensive than you might expect today.


21

Are they called "monochrome" monitors, or something else? Yes. Monochrome covers all that paint in Amber, Green, Blue or white on black. What I want is one of those with glowing green letters made of thin lines on a solid black screen. That sounds more as if you're looking for a vector display. Something incompatible with most old hardware and ...


20

Many TV designs up into the 1970s were so called live chassis designs, which used one leg of the mains input as a reference ground. This saved materials and weight - given some early color TVs used 200+ watts at 100% duty cycle, you would have needed a rather bulky and heavy transformer, given that PSMPS technology was not really mature for consumer devices ...


18

My Amstrad CTM644 CRT 'monitor', makes a high pitched whine [...] My research indicates that this is just the scanning frequency of the tube, The ~15 kHz line frequency is the most likely source. More exactly, it's the retrace, as that's not only one of the most powerful moves the ray does - which equates to higher currents used to initiate it - but it's ...


17

A "monochrome" screen refers to any display which only displays one colour, based on the type of phosphor used. The type you are after is more specifically called a "green screen" monitor. Unfortunately an internet search for this term is going to produce a lot of stuff about movie green-screens - perhaps searching for "green screen ...


15

What was the phosphor resolution? The usual specification quoted for CRT resolution is the 'dot pitch', or distance between groups of RGB phosphor dots. Here are some examples of IBM monitors produced from 1987 to 1993 (taken from here):- Model Year Standard size viewable pixels dot pitch (mm) notes 8513 1987 VGA 12" 10.4" 640x480 ...


15

Basically it's the 15625 Hz sawtooth-like signal that drives the horizontal deflection coil, that is heard because the generated magnetic field moves the coil. It's a problem with all TV CRT, on some is barely audible, in other is more noticeable because the coil is more able to move. You could also hear a 50/60 Hz lower tone sometimes caused by the ...


14

A form of this was used extensively for avionics displays. Known as the penetron (stop giggling), the CRT used a single gun and dual phosphor coatings (red and green). Each frame was drawn in two passes. In the first, low intensity scan the inner phosphor layer would be stimulated (generating, say, red light); a second scan at high beam intensity would ...


14

In the early 80s, cost of RAM for the framebuffer was the dominant factor, closely followed by RAM bandwidth. The difference in resolution between NTSC and PAL systems is minimal in comparison to these factors (note that despite the different number of lines per field and different field rate, each technology used a very similar line rate of ~64us per line, ...


14

This might just be stating the obvious, but Type 30 manual linked in the question describes the device as a random-position point-plotting cathode ray tube. Nowhere does the manual suggest it's a vector graphics display. It then further describes how the computer supplies the X,Y coordinates of a single point to be plotted. There is no facility to plot a ...


12

Yes, back in the day my family had an IDEK brand color CRT that supported setting the color of monochrome signal. It was not a standard PC monitor for VGA only, as it supported both analog and digital inputs, and went down to 15 kHz as it was used with an Amiga as well. In the front panel there were three buttons for disabling each component of RGB ...


11

I have a Eizo 9050s monitor (similar in features to the one mentioned in This answer), which has a "color switch" in the front, with the settings "green/color/amber". In "green", the signal to the red and blue guns is completely shut off. In the "amber" position, the signal to the blue is shut off, and the one to the ...


10

In the Commodore 128, the Video Display Controller (VDC) was used for the 80-column mode. Two variants of the VDC were used, the 8563 and the 8568. Looking at the POKEs, the address 54784 ($D600) is the index register for the VDC, while 54785 ($D601) is the data register. So those two POKEs write the value 232 ($E8) to register 9 of the VDC. Register 9 is ...


10

TV manufacturers didn't have a single, obvious RGB connection standard to implement. Physically, there was SCART (with competing European and Japanese pinouts), RCA, DE-9, and various manufacturer-specific DIN plugs to choose from. Then you have the various electrical signals to send over them such as RGBS, RGsB, RGBHV, YPrPb, digital RGBI, etc. And VCRs ...


9

What would be the ideal resolution? There is no "ideal" resolution. TV screens use "overscan", which means that the full TV image is occluded by a bezel. That doesn't matter for movies, but it does matter if you have text on the screen. So you need to choose a part of the image that would be inside the bezel of most TV models, because ...


8

In the following I'm assuming you don't have the manual brightness control turned down to the minimum. That is the only trivial problem that might cause the issue. When the CRT isn't even able to display it's own OSD, there must be something seriously wrong with it. The OSD is produced by the CRT itself and should come up even without a working connection to ...


7

There are four groups of connectors (Line A, Line B, RGB/Component, and Ext Sync), and each group should be treated as a whole. As it's a monitor, I assume you have an "out" for each "in", and the "out" is just connected to the corresponding "in" (because "out" otherwise doesn't make sense for a monitor). You'...


7

If this is about connecting the color computer to television antenna input via an RF modulator, then the local TV system variant matters, as both the RF modulator for the computer and the RF demodulator in the TV are built to use a certain composite video signal bandwidth. For a 625-line 50 Hz field rate TV system, the maximum composite video signal ...


7

The description of the Spacewar game gives some clues that the Type 30 was not able to display lines, but instead dots. Towards the end of the description, there is the listing how the spaceships were rendered, and even linear sections were given as repeated individual dots. With a true line-rendering capability, the engineers had surely used that instead of ...


6

The PDP-1 Type 30 display, which is the 'canonical' display for the PDP-1, was a point-plotting display, not a vector display. It was a specific device, not a general-purpose oscilloscope. Link to manual. The price list gives it at $14,300 in 1964, though that's the Type 30, not the 30E. HOWEVER, this 1964 PDP-1 price list lists OSCILLOSCOPE DISPLAY TYPE 34 ...


6

The PDP-1 actually used a CRT that was designed for radar (see e.g. the Wikipedia entry). But the whole electronics around the CRT needed to drive the CRT and interface it with the PDP-1 was custom built. And as such, it was nothing like the electronics needed in an oscilloscope. The same is true for later displays used in the PDP series. So the assumption ...


6

Well, I give you the SYM-1, as it could display text output on a user-supplied oscilloscope. Ray was just too much of an engineer to let that pass :) (*1) Beside that somewhat off beat example, I'd say next to every analogue computer would work great with a user supplied oscar. In a more general notion, at a time when displays became a thing, a user supplied ...


5

What you are describing is a cathode ray tube (CRT) that could be part of a terminal such as a VT220 or an ADM5, but it could also be a standalone monitor. Early (80s) home computers would typically connect to a television (either mono or colour), some machines like the PET and IBM System/23 had a built-in CRT and others again used a standalone monitor. ...


5

They were generally called "computer terminals" rather than "monitors". They came with a keyboard, character ROMs, interface devices, etc. The VT220 came in white, green, or amber phosphors.


5

NOTE: This actually refers to the type 340, not the type 30, so it may be irrelevant! The Type 30 input commands worked in several different "modes", including point mode, vector mode, and character mode (with an optional character generator). The actual display was always point-based, unlike the Tektronix 4011/4014 displays which drew straight ...


4

1a. Yes, the shadow mask should be at least double the monitor resolution in both X and Y directions to give a good picture. 1b. Most monitors had hole-style (shadow) masks, but Triniton used an aperture grille with slots and wires that extended the entire vertical height of the image, with one or two wires running horizontally across the screen to stabilize ...


4

I've just realized I have a gap in my understanding of the VGA CRT monitors of the 80386 era (1980s-1990s). It may be more a general need to consult basic information about basic analogue TV/composite video signal structure, independent of PCs or time. What was the phosphor resolution? There is no general (practical) phosphor resolution. Resolution is an ...


4

So when I have a Composite Cable with Video/L/R means, I put the cable into Video IN (Line A) and Audio In (Line A+B)? It looks to be mono audio only so you can either get an adapter that connects left and right audio together or run your stereo audio through a separate amplifier. Either Audio A or B (but not both) will be selected along with the ...


4

My favorites (back in the day) were DEC's VT-100 and VT-220 lines. I also had good luck with Wyse terminals (the Wyse-60 terminal actually had a calculator app built in). The Lear-Siegler ADM-3a models were pretty horrible, I think every one we had in the computer labs in college had had its speaker gouged out or stuffed full of gum. Datamedia DT-80s were VT-...


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