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Not a specific computer monitor at all, rather a generic B&W CRT screen. Setting looks also more like a CCTV, doesn't it, but I suspect it's from some game, so it's fantasy anyway. That hole on the top isn't a socket, but a transport grip. Monitors meant to be integrated in some shelving (like usual for CCTV) got them embedded to save on space, allowing ...


1

That question is a bit broad. what parts of 'pickyness' are meant? One needs to distinguish between the CRT as main powered device and the signal path. Also, if CRT sould refer to 'just' CRT or TV sets. Also, it depends quite alot on the technology used, as CRTs came in countless technological variations. From 12V DC feed all the way to 400 Hz AC. As a ...


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It’s a regular 80s-era TV set, specifically a Ferguson MC01 (from a 1986 Argos catalogue, see this article): the buttons are volume, brightness, contrast, colour, and channel selection buttons. This particular model was designed to be computer-friendly, with RGB support and automatic switching. Ferguson also produced an add-on for 48K ZX Spectrum computers, ...


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There was two main ways of doing this, exemplified by a storage display as used in the Tektronix 401x and the VS-11 type displays used by Digital. The 401x was an ASCII driven terminal and contained its own processors. Normal text was written in a dot matrix font at several prefixed scales, not as vectored glyphs by a pseudo rasterizing mechanism. Graphics ...


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Another issue here: The main value of vector displays is they allow for a higher resolution than raster technology--but these days raster has gotten good enough that this is basically a non-issue. There are two downsides to vector systems that haven't been mentioned so far: 1) Vectors draw lines. The only way to fill an area is to scribble back and ...


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Expanding the existing answer by temlib is that most osciliscopes have some form of X/Y input and better ones support Z (intensity) This allows you to sidestep the complex signal drive problem to the CRT coils and just wrangle the primitives to DAC output part of the problem. And you'll need a decent scope for poking the back of a CRT anyway. Once you have ...


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This gives me the idea of driving a CRT tube raw and naked right from the computer board (set). Perhaps all the high voltage stuff stays inside the monitor housing, but everything else would come from the display module in the computer, i.e., horizontal and vertical deflection and the intensities of the electron rays, monochrome or RGB. This would ...


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You can drive a vector display with a few DACs driven by a FPGA for timing and sequencing the patterns. For a cheap implementation, you can look at the old Vectrex game console which is well documented. It uses only one 8 bits DAC, one analog multiplexer and a few op-amps. Lines are drawn by setting charge current to a R-C circuit, the CPU doesn't ...


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Vector and raster graphics pose different challenges. Raster displays require the ability to very quickly generate a stream of pixels at a continuous rate. Unless one is willing to place severe limits on the number of objects per horizontal line and use separate circuitry for each such object (something many early video game systems in fact did) this will ...


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This is really lots of questions, so a very general answer: If you want to know how retro vector displays worked, have a look e.g. at the Tektronix 4010, the Vector General, or the various vector displays for the PDP models. Bitsavers has manuals. The interface for all of these is a variation of the following principle: Store a "current position" as a ...


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