32

You should be able to use the Amiga hard drive directly on your Linux computer (provided it still has IDE support). Linux also understands AFFS (Amiga Fast File systems), at least once AFFS support is compiled into the kernel (from your "self customized" wording I would assume you know how to do that). Apparently, some Linux tools don't seem to understand ...


25

Can you take these disks off the shelf 30 years later and still expect to read their data? Yes. Although we all experienced floppies fragility, the magnetic media in fact is one of the longest-living we can practically manufacture. Typical streamer tapes are often guaranteed for 30 years. Of course, under very strict handling and storage conditions - but ...


22

There are a few factors: Quality of media. Storage environment (i.e. climate controlled versus humid attic). How many hours of use did the disk experience. Assuming little-to-no use, it probably comes down mostly to quality of the floppy disk media which tends to vary across manufacturers and even production year. The formula wasn't always consistent for a ...


21

For an emulator to be "cycle accurate" means the interactions between the components are timed accurately enough so that the emulation behaves the same way as the original machine for any given input. I mean "input" in the general sense -- both external inputs such as keyboards, joysticks, buttons, etc. and the program (or programs) being run, the data ...


20

There's so much to go wrong in a cassette mechanism that it's amazing they worked at all. can you adjust tape head azimuth? Misalignment is responsible for a lot of sound problems. how clean are your tape player heads? Are the capstan and various drive rollers clean too? are the pressure pads behind the tape intact? Sometimes the little felt pads come ...


18

If "a more modern machine" includes systems with ISA, PCI or PCI Express slots, it should be easy enough to retrieve the data from the drives. You'll need a SCSI adapter (known as a host bus adapter, HBA); you can find loads on auction sites, or SCSI4ME and other places (depending on which country you live in). Adaptec cards are very good and well-supported ...


17

There are three basic ways: a) Get a LAN card and setup a workgroup with all drives shared and access whatever needs to be backuped to your new machine. This is quite dependant on installed software. But chances are good that some NE2000 compatible card driver is already installed. You have to check what I/O bus system is used and buy the apropriate card. ...


15

The short answer is that they will retain data integrity as long as they do. Floppy disks have a number of enemies: Moisture, corrosion, mildew, deformation of the physical media, degradation of adhesives and other materials, magnetic fields, etc. If a floppy disk is treated like a precious document and stored in a UV-proof, temperature and humidity ...


15

In my experience, your best bet to read 2M/2MGUI disks is to find an old PC with a built-in floppy controller, and run either DOS (with 2M and 2MGUI) or Linux (with Mtools, which supports 2M formats) to try to read the disks. Even then, some 2M disks will be hard to read — beyond the usual problems with old floppy disks, since 2M formats really push the ...


13

If you can get your output to a file using redirection, then you can use the Linux open-source project called dotprint to convert the file into a PDF document for printing on a modern printer, viewing on-screen, or transmitting. From the dotprint README: dotprint is a tool that can be used to convert text files that include escape sequences for dot ...


13

If the surface of the disk is not dented, kinked, torn or otherwise damaged, you may be able to recover the data on it. Considering that five and a quarter floppies are long outdated, one can guess that you are referring to the more recent three and a half format diskettes. With that in mind, you can consider to find another undamaged diskette and remove ...


12

listbasic, from the fuse-emulator-utils Debian package: $ listbasic rainbow2.tap 10 REM Rainbowtype 2.0 20 BORDER 0 30 PAPER 0 40 CLS 50 LET b=0 60 BRIGHT b 70 INK 7 100 REM Main 110 PAUSE 0 120 IF INKEY$ = CHR$ 12 THEN GO SUB 500: GO SUB 100 130 IF INKEY$ = CHR$ 7 THEN INK 1: GO SUB 100 140 IF INKEY$ = CHR$ 6 THEN INK 2: GO ...


10

From something I read just the other day on the news: "We regularly read floppy disks from 40 years ago and they are as good as new," he said. [someone at The National Museum of Computing at Bletchley Park] "Magnetic tape has a real issue because when it is on the reels you have a lot of different layers so you have 'print through'," he said. "...


10

You’re running into compatibility issues with very old drives. In this particular case, your drives are new enough to support the ATA “identify device” command (which is how your hwinfo input includes the drive’s names), but there’s something going wrong with the “read capacity” commands. I suspect the reason is that these commands are LBA-based, and your ...


9

The story is told in this 1988 usenet post by Paul Homchick: Some time went by and it was a CP/M world, and diskettes were bigger. In 1981 Richard Greenlaw released SQ and USQ, based on Huffman encoding and written in BDS C. This was the first popular compression technique. Greenlaw gave away the binaries and source code. <...> By 1983 it ...


9

When recently imaging my old Amiga disks, dating from 1989 until about 1993, approximately 80% of them read first time without error, another 10% needed a few retries to get all the data off, 9% had unrecoverable sectors, and 1% appeared to be completely unformatted. (The latter were not virgin blank disks, since they were labelled with their contents.) ...


9

I'm not sure if this is technically possible for the disk format you are asking about, but there is an open source project by David Given called FluxEngine that has been trying to read all kinds of weird and exotic disk formats by reading the magnetic flux changes directly - creating a sort of 'disk image' that can then be deciphered in software to ...


8

TAP files are basicly memory dumps of whatever is saved. In this case the tokenized BASIC program. Check here for a format description. It seems that the simplest way would be to load it into an emulator and 'print' it into a text file. fuse should be able to automate most of this. I'm not sure, but think I remember several utilities to convert TAP into ...


8

What is the optimal way a typical home user can store all these items, on display, to preserve them in their current state for future generations? Keep them in low temperature, dry and dark conditions. Low temperature in this context means around 15 to 20 °C. Dry condition means a humidity of 50-55%. Dark is relative, here a low UV is most important. ...


7

But this seems kinda weird, as it means that all the fill data which appears before the sync byte is unreadable; Aeh ... ok, but then again, why do you want to read it anyway? The fill data is what it says, just a meaningless filler. It if ment to provide some gap to allow different controllers (read with more or less timing difference) to interact. ...


6

There is a Windows program called ZX-Editor that runs perfectly well on Debian (via Wine). Simply open the .TAP file, and save a .BAS file. It allowed me to extract this: # BAS file "rainbow2" created by ZX-Modules # Run-time Variables Var b: Num = 1 Var ypos: Num = 1 Var xpos: Num = 21 # End Run-time Variables 10 REM Rainbowtype 2.0 20 BORDER 0 ...


5

I grew up on the Apple II, and I also remember other kids taking 5.25" floppies out of the sleeve, and just putting them in the drive directly, and they worked. That may be more difficult with 3.5" floppies, because the loading mechanism doesn't really leave much room, so I'd consider doing this with the external drive housing opened, so you can properly ...


5

Solved: Turns out that my microcontroller board, an otherwise excellent Cypress CY8CKIT-059 PSOC5LP, had a 1uF capacitor between DENSITY SELECT and ground. So, whenever that pin changed state, the value the drive saw would change quite slowly over time. Crudely ripping it off the board made it all work. Frankly, I'm amazed it did anything useful at all ...


4

I know I'm responding to an old post here but I though I would share my recent experiences. I recently purchased a TEAC 5.25" floppy drive off eBay for the purpose of going through a bunch of old 5.25" disk that I have (some were mine originally, others come from a bunch I bought at a thrift store a long time ago). I've gone through about two dozen double ...


4

Video game systems are generally designed to be connected to a CRT display whose beam will scan from top to bottom 50 (PAL) or roughly 60 (NTSC) times per second, and left to right 15,650 (PAL) or roughly 15,750 (NTSC) times/second. During each instruction cycle, the beam will move a certain distance, and the effects of certain operations may be affected by ...


4

For "cycle accurate" emulation, an emulator needs to make sure that software using delay loops (or carefully timed assembly instructions) gets a reaction after the same number of cycles as on a real system. In many (especially old) systems, peripherals are clocked by the main CPU, e.g. the old ISA bus traditionally just used whatever frequency the CPU had (...


4

I use QPCPrint (as mentioned above) on my PC, but have also released my own ESC/P2 to PDF convertor - https://github.com/RWAP/PrinterToPDF, written in C, which is designed to run on Linux


4

Haven't used MFM and Floppy for a really long time... but around 2011 I was in process of converting all my physical floppies from ZX Spectrum and D40/D80 (using MDOS) to images for my own ZX Spectrum emulator (in fear they got demagnetized and also to test my emulator). I did go the same way as you (using MCU AT32UC3A0512 as FDC and I succeded :) ). Its too ...


4

A web search finds a number of companies which provide this sort of service, but I have never used any (and this isn’t the place to endorse one either). There are some volunteers around the globe who might be able to help — the Archive Team has a list of volunteers, and a trip to vintage computing forums will find more. Terry Stewart (in New Zealand) also ...


3

The optical drive in your computer is probably a CD-ROM reader. Unless it actually says "Recordable" or "Rewritable" on the front, don't assume that it will be able to record. It may not handle DVD-ROMs at all. Check to see if it has the DVD symbol on the front. Your computer appears to have a SCSI connector, so the simplest method may be to connect an ...


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