62

Forty years ago, a 7MB file would be unheard of, at least in contexts where floppies would be the only available means of transferring it. (Tapes were commonly used for large transfers on minis and mainframes.) In slightly more recent times (even thirty-odd years ago, and then as long as floppies were still useful), we used archiving tools with support for ...


49

The most classic serial solution here was ofc a direct serial connection and Kermit the most versatile software solution. Developed at the Columbia University, NYC, Kermit supported already in the early 1980s several hundred different systems. It's most prominent feature was the ability to run over non transparent and code converted connections. Similar, but ...


26

As well as splitting across multiple floppy disks, there were several cabled communication options available ranging from your basic serial cables and sending data over via X/Y/ZMODEM or Kermit, but there was also specialized parallel cables (like printer cables) that could be used that facilitated even faster transfers. I think "LapLink" was a such a ...


24

40 years ago - 1978 - there was no home/hobbyist/small office computing to speak of. Maybe a few hundred people altogether. So you must be talking about commercial/industrial computing. For large files we used 1/2" mag tape: You've seen drives like this in older movies: These tapes could hold one hell of a lot of data: Maybe 50Mb. (Really high ...


21

I personally did not do any data transfer from home 8-bit systems to other systems, but I did do transfers from several older proprietary systems to Unix and MSDOS systems back in the 80’s. We used a null modem cable (serial cable) and software called B.L.A.S.T. which was a commercial product that was ported to a wide variety of systems. It is a serial ...


20

Even though with a standard floppy drive there is no way to read it, there are several ways to do this: If you have two floppy drives, you can use a program called Adfread (download) to override the way Windows reads the second. This only works with Windows 2000 onwards, (but not Windows ME). The SuperCard Pro or Kyroflux controllers, that can be connected ...


18

Assuming your data is on floppy disk and you have a functioning disk drive it is pretty easy to transfer files from an Apple II via cassette port. The program that I recommend using is called ADTPRO. http://adtpro.sourceforge.net/ You will need to first bootstrap ADTPRO using the following tutorial: http://adtpro.sourceforge.net/bootstrapaudio.html Once ...


18

I worked on a project quite a few years ago (late 80's) where a client purchased truckloads of surplus military electronics inventory that he intended to sell into the spare parts market. The inventory documentation came out of a mainframe computer and was printed onto a three inch stack of fanfold green bar computer paper. The project I was hired for was to ...


18

Wikipedia “Intended as means of indicating on paper or magnetic tapes that the end of the usable portion of the tape had been reached.”, if en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C0_and_C1_control_codes#EM is to be believed. ECMA-6 ASCII was codified internationally as ISO/IEC 646 which in turn was ratified by ECMA as ECMA-6. Section 8.12 EM END OF MEDIUM of a PDF image ...


17

No, there were no adapters for different floppies. Data was typically copied by serial port, if it was copied at all: Programs on some 8-bit computer (e.g. Apple II, Commodore 64) wouldn't run on an 16-bit 8086 PC. There were no emulators (and the original 8086 PC would probably also have been too slow). So stuff you'd like to copy were typically source ...


16

TL;DR; EM (or EOM as in early documents - and Unicode as well) was and is widely used in data transmission to mark either The physical end of a medium, The end of the used portion of a medium The end of meaningful (wanted) data on a medium. (Like Scruss already described in his answer) It was used with next to any RJE station as well as terminal. The ...


15

A PC floppy controller can control two drives. For the third and fourth drive you'd need a secondary controller. I haven't ever seen one for PCI, only for ISA - some ISA cards can be configured to primary or secondary. Edit: Raffzahn is correct: early floppy controllers did support all four drives the Shugart bus provided for. This changed with the clone ...


14

Do have a 7 MiB file, you would need a HD at least that size. In reality even a manyfold thereof, as usually one won't have a HD with just one file. Now, in the real early times, lets say 70s, home users wouldn't have disks at all - not even floppies, and professional users with minis would use disk packs (exchangeable hard disks) and maybe fixed disks of ...


13

The official ones, with GS/OS versions as indicated by the Apple II History site: Filename Purpose In GS/OS Version APPLESHARE.FST For AppleTalk networks 5.0 CHAR.FST Keyboard, screen, printers, and modems 4.0 DOS3.3.FST Apple II DOS 3.3 Disks (Read only) 6.0 HFS.FST Mac OS ...


13

It's a one-way Teletext system. Basically, the pages are sent in conjunction with the broadcast signal. The TV receiver knows how to extract the page information from the analog video signal. As you noted television broadcasts are one-way; all of the page content would be sent one page after the next. The receiver could cache this information if desired ...


13

Following the Shugart standard, selections for 4 drives (DS0..DS3) are available on a single interface. The drives had to be jumpered accordingly. Hardware-wise the PC floppy controller also supports this. But as the original housing only allowed two (full height) drives, the controller thus split the interface onto two (proprietary) connectors: one PCB ...


13

If you're happy to copy files and use Sneakernet then you could use a disk emulator like Floppy Emu, SDFloppy II, wDrive, etc. (Obviously all product links in this answer are likely to break in the future.) Note that SmartPort disk emulators require at least a ROM 0 //c. Instructions for upgrading are given here. There are various upgrade kits that include ...


12

I have done my share of transfers between incompatible systems. There were some service bureaus that could convert floppy disks between different systems, and I used some to convert CP/M-86 commercial software for an Altos 586 (my first computer) that had a floppy format not supported by all vendors, which was a common problem when new systems came out. But ...


11

There were (and are) a few possibilities to transfer programs* and data between 8 bit Commodore systems and other platforms via floppy disks and other media. Commodore 1541 floppy drives could be modified to read, and to a limited extent, write PC compatible floppies. Commodore 1571 and 1581 floppy drives for 8-bit Commodore home computers were able to ...


10

Some sort of comms program that supports Zmodem on the 286 end and use "sz" to send from the unix end. Zmodem has some advantages in that usually the receiving computer will auto start reception of a file when it sees a Zmodem start sequence (there's a random number handshake to stop spoofing) The reason for recommending Zmodem is means you don't need to ...


10

Ceefax uses the Teletext system. This protocol encodes data, such as text, in the vertical blanking periods of the PAL video signal. Each packet is 45 bytes long, where each byte is normally sent with the LSB first.p17 Packets could be sent from lines 6 to 22 and 318 to 335 inclusive.p14 Each data packet occupies one TV line.p15 The first three bytes are ...


10

Your timescales are out. Floppies might have just existed 40 years ago, but your average office worker never saw one. More to the point, office workers didn't pass machine-readable data around the office to each other, the only equipment they had that could read the data was a shared mainframe, so they would both access the same copy. From Gio Wiederhold, ...


9

The Amiga uses a standard floppy drive, but doesn't use a standard controller. Data on a magnetic media is essentially stored as flux changes over time where the controller will detect if the magnetic flux has changed over a certain period of time to make it a 0 or a 1. The problem is that the read head will be less sensitive to a change if it exposed to ...


8

I have just completed an open source solution to this problem available at http://amiga.robsmithdev.co.uk with full source code. The project is based around an Arduino and example code is for Windows (Visual Studio) but could be ported to other O/S easily


8

That would be any device that likes to take over the bus. Usually that would be some DMA controller handling an interface like a serial or parallel one. But it also can be anything you want - like another CPU. Its function is that another device (not the CPU) pulls /BUSREQ whenever it needs control of the system. When the CPU is ready to release the BUS it ...


7

Any cassette tape system which can utilize a standard cassette tape recorder can be plugged into any audio device, with sufficient quality, and will work. You can record saved files with any audio recording app and load it back in by playing it back. I know this is regularly done on the Apple II, Sinclair ZX Spectrum, and Tandy Color Computer systems, and ...


7

Actually, you're asking about two separate things here. The first is "how to get my tapes to a PC" and second is "how to convert tape records into a disk file/image". The former can be solved with http://turgen.sourceforge.net, the latter is a bit more complicated. There had been many native tools for this task but the conversion is not always possible -- ...


7

You can also use dosbox or dosemu to run a simulated DOS environment, give it access to whatever ttyS* or ttyUSB* you have, and then use the DOS-to-DOS transfer methods. Personally, I prefer Laplink, which offers a convenient Norton-Commander like interface for file transfer. It can also bootstrap via the CTTY command on the remote computer, which is handy ...


7

Which OS? Using a Unix or variant, we used cpio, which would detect end of media (tape or floppy) and prompt to replace and continue onto (or from) another volume. The media was just treated as a sequence of blocks of data. If using MSDOS, there was BACKUP and RESTORE commands that spanned floppies but I’m not sure if they were in DOS exactly 40 years ...


7

I transferred a lot of text documents and spreadsheets/databases from my ZX Spectrum to my Sinclair QL using the Sinclair network, a 80kBps serial network that was inbuilt into the QL and provided by Interface 1 on the ZX Spectrum. This network could connect up to 64 QLs and ZX Spectrum. My Spectrum also had to serve as a print spooler for the QL, as I did ...


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