29

I commend your desire for accuracy in software preservation. How am I supposed to know what a game actually was officially called? This presupposes the existence of a single, official title. That may not always be the case. Titles of software are often chosen quite late in development, and may be localized, or chosen by the publisher and not the creator ...


14

Try and find the book "Programmers at work" by Susan Lammers, subtitled "interviews with 19 programmers who shaped the software industry" (slight hyperbole), written in 1986. Apart from the value of the interviews themselves, it is fascinating to read them 35 years on to see how much has changed. One of the interviews is with C. Wayne ...


9

BeOS used extended attributes heavily. In OS/2, REXX scripts are tokenised into extended attributes, and all sorts of things like icons and whatnot used them. There were a decent arrangement of tools to access and edit the EAs. 4OS2 could store its descriptions in EA.


8

As time goes by, CPU power becomes cheaper and more plentiful, to the point where it makes sense to start spending some of it using more complex storage formats that save disk space and bandwidth, and indeed modern databases can do this. Oh, the situation was rather the other way around. There was never enough disk space. If one got to store several tables ...


8

I'll admit to not quite understanding their jargon, but it looks like IBM's AS/400 (1988) and to a certain extent, System/38 before it (1978) relied on object or database-style single-level storage rather than hierarchical files.


7

It would be remiss to neglect the original Mac HFS with its core support of the Resource Fork. A normal Macintosh file had two forks: the data fork, and the resource fork. The resource fork was a key/value store, with the values typically being large binary blobs (most notably icons, code, sounds, etc.). The data fork was where typical "read" and &...


7

The Sinclair QL's file system has a 64-byte "File header" providing metadata for the file. Among system-owned fields like modified/access dates, file length, type and name, it also holds 8 bytes of so-called "type-dependent data" that can be used by specific file types for their own metadata. Due to the structure of QDOS I/O, that header ...


6

AmigaOS, first released in 1985, made extensive use of key/value attributes that could be defined by the user in a GUI and recognized by any tool. (e.g. an application/program). This was done using a metadata system implemented through "Tool types" that were embedded within the .info file. Every Tool or Project (e.g. a document) had an icon and ...


6

You need to understand that using the 8087 was effectively "free" for the developers and for the users. You linked in a floating point library that determined the existence of the 8087, and if it was there, it used it. If not it fell back to a software method. This means that the users don't have to do anything special to their code to leverage it. ...


5

Does the Pick operating system fit in here? I have never seen it, but it is described as being based on associative arrays, which sounds much like a key-value store to me.


3

If it is this document: @book{wuerth1994design, title={DESIGN: A Program to Create Data Entry Programs}, author={Wuerth, J.M. and Weise, D.R.}, series={General technical report PSW}, url={https://books.google.cl/books?id=h2-bP\_2P6sYC}, year={1994}, publisher={U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station} } ...


2

MacOS and BeOS have already been mentioned here, but no has yet mentioned PalmOS. Development originally occurred on the Mac platform, and it inherited the Mac's technique of creating application files as a collection of resources, specified by type and ID number.


2

IBM System/23 (1981) had database functionality built in at ROM level. Where the distinction is made between the filesystem and the BASIC interpreter is uncertain though.


2

Many database programs, including later versions of dBase and Paradox, provided features beyond simple database table storage lookup. They could generate tables dynamically, and also had programming languages that enabled open-ended calculations and report generation. Some people used them somewhat like spreadsheets, or where one might use a statistics or ...


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