21

The Z80 is "binary compatible" with the 8080. It adds a bunch of new instructions, but places them all in unused (well, undocumented) opcodes. yes .. err, no, they placed them on redundant opcodes. For example the whole 00-xxx-000 group were NOP instructions for the 8080, while Zilog only left 00h as NOP, while the others became jumps (and EX). ...


16

The old IDA freeware ver.3.7 supports Z80. It has a Turbo Vision style interface, which may be something that puts you off. It is also no longer distributed officially. However, it is very powerful, and if you can live with its quirks, you will be able to find it on many abandonware websites. Alternatively, a lot of people started switching to NSA-developed ...


10

There is no format. The ROM contains code and data, and ROM is at the end of the MCU memory space, while RAM is at the start of the MCU memory space. The CPU simply fetches from the reset vector, two bytes starting from address $FFFE, and the 16-bit value fetched from ROM is the address where it then goes to execute code. The ROM is 16 kilobytes so the ROM ...


8

There's an interesting thread here: http://forum.6502.org/viewtopic.php?t=2037 The syntax table is in reverse order, as you've already noticed. An underscore is stored at the end of the line by the line input routine. There are 32 categories (well, that's what I'm going to call them). Each category contains one or more rules. The syntax ...


7

You might be thinking of Resorcerer (apparently still available for purchase), which was like a beefed up version of ResEdit and included CODE disassembly functionality. Macintosh Garden has some screenshots of the older version. Apple also had a CODE editor for ResEdit which was sometimes distributed as "Super ResEdit"


7

Those numbers are not correct. Super Mario Bros had 40 KiB of total ROM (32K PRG-ROM (program ROM) and 8K CHR-ROM (character ROM, for storing graphics data)). Pac-Man had 24K (16K PRG, 8K CHR). Super Mario Bros. 3 had 384K total (256K PRG, 128K CHR). Some games were even bigger (and a even few exceeded 1MiB, as you mentioned in your question). There were ...


6

Technically, the most up to date modern fork of otx is being maintained by Zhi-Wei Cai on GitHub here. v1.7: Build 566 or a fresh clone of master should work on any modern OS X system. But that's not why we're here. This is Retrocomputing Stack Exchange after all. The most recent fork of otx which works on legacy OS X platforms is probably the linuxaged ...


6

DGEN emulator has a starscream 68k core with a builtin dissasembler and debugger . ` might be the key to break into it once rom is running. It's also easy to recompile with SDL as the gfx/audio interface so you brew your own debug focused emulator, slap on a Python interface or similar and you got yourself a stew!


5

Disclaimer: I work for Hex-Rays. The IDA Pro by Hex-Rays supports disassembly of several processor families with “wide instruction words”, for example: PDP-11 (16-bit instructions) PIC (12-, 14- and 16-bit instruction sizes) Various DSPs from AD, TI and Motorola (generally 16 to 48 bits) Itanium (VLIW, 128-bit instruction bundles) (There are probably more ...


5

Those codes have nothing to do with the CPU instructions. You write the program that interprets the compressed data according to the given rules to decompress it. The # is the bits marked with x in the commands. # represents a parameter how much data to operate on. The first command byte is 01h, it is a direct copy command with # value 1, so copy next 2 ...


5

The MPW toolchain for Classic Mac OS which was available for free at ftp.apple.com comes with the DeRez tool that can decompile resource forks: http://mirror.informatimago.com/next/developer.apple.com/tools/mpw-tools/commandref/derez.html The internet archive has a backup of the ftp site for historical purposes, but I can't confirm the url as archive.org is ...


4

The Paul Farrow disassembly listings collection is the best I know. http://www.fruitcake.plus.com/Sinclair/Spectrum128/ROMDisassembly/Spectrum128ROMDisassembly4.htm It doesn't include the address of each instruction, BUT it includes the address of many entry points and loops as labels with the format L + hexadecimal address so it's rather easy to match any ...


2

I've done my first shares of Genesis disassembly with Charles Doty's DISASM.exe. Please, note that you will need to run it in DOSBox.


2

Sorry, so far no link to RA87 tools, but the AS assembler might be worth a try. It is well maintained (*1) and very well documented. It supports various NEC families including the 78C1x series, essentially the top end models of whats mentioned in your data book, which are (mostly) upward compatible with the 7800 (*2). If this doesn't fit your needs, maybe ...


2

I understand each of these rows to be sequential instructions. Exactly, they are description (opcodes and data structure) for the virtual machine which is the decoder. What am I missing though to translate this into pseudocode that a non-"old school" programmer like myself can understand? There is nothing 'old school' in there. Virtual machines ...


2

I had largely same requirements for similar CPU but ended up using f9dasm. But if you are serious then look at IDA Pro.


1

Will the 8080 tests be valid 8080 assembly code? Only if they do not contain any undocumented 8080 opcodes, they will remain valid after Z80 disassembler.


1

What am I missing though to translate this into pseudocode that a non-"old school" programmer like myself can understand? It's hard to say what you're missing. It certainly doesn't seem to require any prior knowledge of 6502 machine code. I understand each of these rows to be sequential instructions. Yes. The compressed map is a mini-"program". Each row ...


1

If you object using non-demo ida pro, you can try Ghidra tool, which is much like ida pro (and not simply an disassembler!). It is open source and does support 68000.


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