17

From some quick research, WinUAE (a popular Amiga emulator) supports reading a DMS file just like an ADF. So you could probably mount it and then save it back as ADF. Also, according to the ADF Opus tool site, they can read DMS also.


11

When you used dd, did you capture it from the first physical sector? Or did you merely grab the volume of interest? If you did it on \\.\Volume{$$$$$$$$-$$$$-....}, then you only got C:, not the whole disk. You need to do it on \\.\PhysicalDrive# (whatever # it is) to get everything - including the Master Boot Record (MBR) which is in the first physical ...


10

The reasons are partly technical and partly historical. The basic Apple II disk image formats are unadorned and unstructured. The files just hold a copy of the disk data, from the first track to the last, as read by the operating system. The way in which the data is read from the physical floppy determines the ordering. If your disk imaging program runs ...


9

The bootprocess itself don't know any 'not bootable' exit. If a disk can be read, the first sector is loaded at 800 and then jumped to 801 (800 holds a counter for the number of sectors to read by the bootloader - usually 1). If there is no sector to be found, it spins indefinit. Non bootable disks may have some kind of error message, but don't have to. You ...


8

Well, after spending some time googling last night I have discovered something called SIO2PC. This is probably old news to the Atari fans out there, but in case anyone is having the same initial questions I was, I thought I would answer my own question with what I have learned. Please feel free to correct me if I get this wrong, or add more information. ...


7

I successfully dumped data from disk to image. I used two programs from Aminet: http://aminet.net/package/disk/misc/xfs http://aminet.net/package/util/cli/bcopy First need to mount DEV device from xfs and then run command: bcopy DEV:scsi.device,0 backup:seagate.hdf Bcopy is compatible with xfs but working slow, I think is matter of way how it is copying ...


7

I used the dsk2cdt tool to convert a .dsk image to a .cdt tape file. I can then play this tape file via an app (or convert it to audio data) and use a standard Amstrad tape cable to play the audio out to the 6128. I place a blank or erasable disk in the 6128, and then type |tape and run" Then I start the tape audio playing, which will load a boot program ...


7

I've written various programs that may help, if the DSK files don't make use of copy protection. If you can get files onto the +3 via the ZXMMC, you can use DU54 at http://www.seasip.info/Cpm/software/amstrad.html to write unprotected disk images to disk (or vice versa). It may be easier to unpack DU54.PMA within a CP/M emulator and just transfer the +3 ...


7

ToolShed seems to be the current maintained OS9/descendants disk manager tool. It's not a file browser but works on the command line. Are you sure your disk image is a valid RBF image, though? Toolshed refuses to read it: $ os9 dir os9000-xibase.img dir: error 216 opening 'os9000-xibase.img,' dir: error 216 opening 'os9000-xibase.img' Similarly, checking ...


7

Another partial answer. .d13 is a format for storing the 13-sector floppy disks that were used on the Apple II before mid-1980, by Apple OS's before before DOS 3.3; i.e. Apple DOS 3.1, 3.2 and 3.2.1, the earliest versions of Microsoft's Softcard-based Apple CP/M 2.2, and maybe by the first version of Apple PASCAL (not sure about that though); those floppies ...


6

(Some background: the 9122D uses Sony OA-D32W floppy drives. Here's a service manual and a discussion about repairing these drives.) If you want a perfect 1:1 image of the floppy disk at the magnetic level, you will need a KryoFlux or equivalent. Maybe this isn't necessary for your purposes. @wizzwizz4 provided instructions on using dd in Linux to create ...


6

If you can get HPDrive working on a PC so that it can act a hard drive your HP 9000 model 310 computer then you should be able to use it's complementary utility HPDir to make an image of your HP 9133 drive. You'll need to a suitable HP-IB/IEEE-488 interface card for your PC for this work, but you'd also need such a card for HPDrive to work. Your specific ...


6

You can manage CoCo disk images quite easily with MAME's imgtool. I've assumed you want to use RS-DOS on a CoCo 2, launching xroar via: xroar -default-machine coco2bus To make a blank, single-sided disk image, enter imgtool create coco_jvc_rsdos new.dsk The file will be 161280 bytes long: 35 tracks × 9 sectors × 512 bytes per sector. I'm assuming your ...


5

I'm about 11 months too late, but thought I'd add for anyone else looking for help with the same issue. There are a couple utilities I wrote a long time ago which might be useful to someone attemping to access a raw drive. They are part of the bffs package on Aminet: http://aminet.net/disk/misc/bffs16_src.lha One is dcp. With it, you can copy from/to a ...


5

You can read the floppy in any FDD (mechanically compatible). The problem lies with FDC compatibility. Each FDC controller looks for a specific pattern on the track to find out where the sector starts are. Some FDCs are incompatible and when using the same floppy formatted on incompatible FDC then no matter what you do you can not read the data. For ...


5

AFAIR the error info is just an attached block with one byte per sector of the imaged disk, thelling if that sector did produce a read error in the first place. Within the plethora of tools to handle D64 files several can show the error block. IIRC C64-Studio as a one stop solution for C64 development was one of them. Similar the D64-Editor as a tools just ...


5

There is no specific 'format' required. On a real PDP-11, what happens at bootup depends on what kind of boot PROM you have installed. In general, for disk-type devices the convention is to load the first block then jump to the code in that block. If you don't have a boot PROM for the device you want to boot from, you may have to toggle in a bootloader ...


5

Keir Fraser’s Disk Utilities include an analysis and conversion program, disk-analyse, which can convert to and from ImageDisk files (among others). To convert an ImageDisk file to a plain MFM disk image suitable for use with virtualisation software, run disk-analyse image.imd image.img It might take a little while, and the program is silent at first which ...


5

Here's what I've been able to determine: A short filesystem on a floppy should work fine, as long as the blocks are in the right order. If the image you're using is a raw image (819200 bytes exactly, often used by emulators, that's easy. Just fdformat the floppy device for 1.44MiB as you would for any other DOS/Windows/Linux machine and write the image ...


5

c2t converts from 140K disk images to audio files, though only AIFF or WAV files. It might take some experimentation to get MP3 encoding settings that work using the Apple II's LOAD command, though. c2t-96h encodes the 9600 baud audio data at 48kHz, so lame -V2 has a fair chance of working c2t is used by the amazing Apple II Disk Server. It allows you to ...


5

I can offer a partial answer only: .dsk, .do and .po are all the same file format: sector contents only, implicitly ordered. The difference is that DOS 3.3 and Pro-DOS use different orderings, so it's fairly common to use .do or .po as a file extension in order to be explicit about which of those filing systems' orderings the disk image should be ...


4

Assuming that you have used a standard DOS file system: Remove the first floppy disk from the drive. Put the floppy disk in your modern 3.5" floppy reader. Connect your modern floppy reader to a computer with dd installed - probably a GNU/Linux distro. Run the command: dd if=/dev/fd0 of=~/floppy.img Repeat once from 2. with the second floppy disk, ...


4

The purpose of those error blocks is to emulate copy protection. It's not enough to do error recovery. You'd need to make copies in the G64 format which is made from the raw GCR stream. The error block simply instructs the emulator to raise the error number when trying to access a sector that is tagged. I'd expect that any sector with a non-zero entry ...


4

You may try to convert the offered WAV/AIFF files into an MP3 using some offline tool (preferred) like FFMPEG or an online conversion site like this one (no endorsement whatsoever). It's a trial and error process, as conversion might change the resulting sound. This is especially true for conversion into MP3, as it's not only a lossy format (*1), but the ...


4

From my answer to How do I know where the file directory is stored on a Spectrum +3 disk layout? Part 26 of the +3 manual is what you need to read. There is even a complete example of how to write boot code and how to store it into the disk. This part is the relevant one regarding which values the disk specification block must have: bootstart: ; ;The ...


4

Look carefully at the docs again (Web Archive one). "The file bodies are stored after the directory entries. Basic program and data array files have an addition at the end of the file." If it is basic program, there are 4 bytes: 2 fixed values 127,170 and autostart line number 0.. 9999. If it is data array, there are also 4 bytes: 2 fixed values 127,170, 1 ...


3

libdsk can convert IMD to a raw disc image. dskconv -otype raw file.imd file.img or in versions prior to 1.5.5: dsktrans -otype raw file.imd file.img


3

(sorry, this is not really an answer, but I cannot post comments yet) Given the constraints you have, it seems difficult. I do not know about the Spectrum side of it, but I did use a homemade parallel cable back in the days: http://cpctech.cpc-live.com/docs/mods/parallel.html This being said, you would still need a parallel port on your PC, a DOS/FreeDOS ...


3

I think some of the answers here are combining determining the disk format with detecting if it's bootable. I've answered how the format is detected on its own question, so here I'll concentrate on the boot process. The +3 tries to boot from a disc by using the DOS_BOOT function. This selects drive A:, closes any open files on it, and then tries to read ...


2

The Disk Masher System entry on the Archive Team wiki suggests the following tools: xDMS (Public Domain, portable C source) dms111 (Original Amiga software) Ancient Format Decompressor (decompresses to ADF) The linked xDMS page claims... Supports decompression of files compressed using all known DMS compression modes, including old ...


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