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10

The reasons are partly technical and partly historical. The basic Apple II disk image formats are unadorned and unstructured. The files just hold a copy of the disk data, from the first track to the last, as read by the operating system. The way in which the data is read from the physical floppy determines the ordering. If your disk imaging program runs ...


9

The bootprocess itself don't know any 'not bootable' exit. If a disk can be read, the first sector is loaded at 800 and then jumped to 801 (800 holds a counter for the number of sectors to read by the bootloader - usually 1). If there is no sector to be found, it spins indefinit. Non bootable disks may have some kind of error message, but don't have to. You ...


8

When you used dd, did you capture it from the first physical sector? Or did you merely grab the volume of interest? If you did it on \\.\Volume{$$$$$$$$-$$$$-....}, then you only got C:, not the whole disk. You need to do it on \\.\PhysicalDrive# (whatever # it is) to get everything - including the Master Boot Record (MBR) which is in the first physical ...


8

Well, after spending some time googling last night I have discovered something called SIO2PC. This is probably old news to the Atari fans out there, but in case anyone is having the same initial questions I was, I thought I would answer my own question with what I have learned. Please feel free to correct me if I get this wrong, or add more information. ...


7

ToolShed seems to be the current maintained OS9/descendants disk manager tool. It's not a file browser but works on the command line. Are you sure your disk image is a valid RBF image, though? Toolshed refuses to read it: $ os9 dir os9000-xibase.img dir: error 216 opening 'os9000-xibase.img,' dir: error 216 opening 'os9000-xibase.img' Similarly, checking ...


6

You can manage CoCo disk images quite easily with MAME's imgtool. I've assumed you want to use RS-DOS on a CoCo 2, launching xroar via: xroar -default-machine coco2bus To make a blank, single-sided disk image, enter imgtool create coco_jvc_rsdos new.dsk The file will be 161280 bytes long: 35 tracks × 9 sectors × 512 bytes per sector. I'm assuming your ...


6

If you can get HPDrive working on a PC so that it can act a hard drive your HP 9000 model 310 computer then you should be able to use it's complementary utility HPDir to make an image of your HP 9133 drive. You'll need to a suitable HP-IB/IEEE-488 interface card for your PC for this work, but you'd also need such a card for HPDrive to work. Your specific ...


6

I've written various programs that may help, if the DSK files don't make use of copy protection. If you can get files onto the +3 via the ZXMMC, you can use DU54 at http://www.seasip.info/Cpm/software/amstrad.html to write unprotected disk images to disk (or vice versa). It may be easier to unpack DU54.PMA within a CP/M emulator and just transfer the +3 ...


5

Here's what I've been able to determine: A short filesystem on a floppy should work fine, as long as the blocks are in the right order. If the image you're using is a raw image (819200 bytes exactly, often used by emulators, that's easy. Just fdformat the floppy device for 1.44MiB as you would for any other DOS/Windows/Linux machine and write the image ...


5

You can read the floppy in any FDD (mechanically compatible). The problem lies with FDC compatibility. Each FDC controller looks for a specific pattern on the track to find out where the sector starts are. Some FDCs are incompatible and when using the same floppy formatted on incompatible FDC then no matter what you do you can not read the data. For ...


5

(Some background: the 9122D uses Sony OA-D32W floppy drives. Here's a service manual and a discussion about repairing these drives.) If you want a perfect 1:1 image of the floppy disk at the magnetic level, you will need a KryoFlux or equivalent. Maybe this isn't necessary for your purposes. @wizzwizz4 provided instructions on using dd in Linux to create ...


5

AFAIR the error info is just an attached block with one byte per sector of the imaged disk, thelling if that sector did produce a read error in the first place. Within the plethora of tools to handle D64 files several can show the error block. IIRC C64-Studio as a one stop solution for C64 development was one of them. Similar the D64-Editor as a tools just ...


5

There is no specific 'format' required. On a real PDP-11, what happens at bootup depends on what kind of boot PROM you have installed. In general, for disk-type devices the convention is to load the first block then jump to the code in that block. If you don't have a boot PROM for the device you want to boot from, you may have to toggle in a bootloader ...


4

Keir Fraser’s Disk Utilities include an analysis and conversion program, disk-analyse, which can convert to and from ImageDisk files (among others). To convert an ImageDisk file to a plain MFM disk image suitable for use with virtualisation software, run disk-analyse image.imd image.img It might take a little while, and the program is silent at first which ...


4

The purpose of those error blocks is to emulate copy protection. It's not enough to do error recovery. You'd need to make copies in the G64 format which is made from the raw GCR stream. The error block simply instructs the emulator to raise the error number when trying to access a sector that is tagged. I'd expect that any sector with a non-zero entry ...


4

Assuming that you have used a standard DOS file system: Remove the first floppy disk from the drive. Put the floppy disk in your modern 3.5" floppy reader. Connect your modern floppy reader to a computer with dd installed - probably a GNU/Linux distro. Run the command: dd if=/dev/fd0 of=~/floppy.img Repeat once from 2. with the second floppy disk, ...


4

I used dsk2cdt to convert a .dsk image to a tape file. You can then play this tape file through a laptop, and use a standard Amstrad tape cable to connect the laptop audio to the 6128. You place a disk in the 6128, and then type |tape and run" Start the CDT playing on the laptop. This will load a program on the Amstrad, which reads the sectors and writes ...


2

To create boot disks for a apple 512k macintosh I had to take a 1.44MB floppy, tape the hole to make it into a 720KB floppy, and then format the floppy as an APPLE floppy and not a PC floppy with a superdrive equipped old world g3 mac tower running osx 10.3. Then I could write the image. A linux install on an oldworld machine with a superdrive may work to ...


2

Real Mac/IIgs 800k floppy disks cannot be written from Linux because Apple used GCR to get 800k on the disk instead of the 720k that the PC did. You need a Superdrive to write Mac/IIgs format 800k disks. However as @Mark pointed out you can write 800k disk images to 1440k disks from a PC and a Mac with a Superdrive will read/boot them since the disk images ...


2

(sorry, this is not really an answer, but I cannot post comments yet) Given the constraints you have, it seems difficult. I do not know about the Spectrum side of it, but I did use a homemade parallel cable back in the days: http://cpctech.cpc-live.com/docs/mods/parallel.html This being said, you would still need a parallel port on your PC, a DOS/FreeDOS ...


2

Because these drives have different geometries and multiple partitions, you can't dd the whole thing in one pass and expect everything to work. In particular, your DOS partitition which was located at cylinder 9, track/head 0, sector 1 on the old drive, is now located somewhere different on the new drive (which has 4 times as many tracks per cylinder as the ...


2

I recommend trying Copy II Mac, but not to make a disk image. Rather, use it to successfully copy your original floppy disk to the floppy emulator/drive. You may even be able to use it to edit the sectors of the original floppy and undo whatever cleverness your younger self added. Like most other System 6 MacOS software, Copy II Mac can be found on the Mac ...


2

libdsk can convert IMD to a raw disc image. dskconv -otype raw file.imd file.img or in versions prior to 1.5.5: dsktrans -otype raw file.imd file.img


1

IIRC, the way I did this a couple decades ago was to write a bit of 68000 assembly language code that called the RWTS (read-write-track-sector) routine in the Mac ROM. If you could boot a Mac OS System, there was also a low-level OS routine that could be called (documented in Inside Mac?). Then I would poke those bytes in from Basic (or perhaps Forth?) and ...


1

This drive uses the IEEE-488 (aka GPIB) protocol. You can make a USB adapter for this, then use a virtual COM port to communicate with the drive. I haven't found information about the specific API - these varied between different GPIB devices.


1

Like Ken Gober said, you can't expect to clone drives with different geometries this easily :) Also you should make sure the BIOS recognizes the drive properly. If it's an early revision it might be limited by the 504 MB barrier (1024/16/63). Your 1GB CF exceeds those (967/32/63). If in doubt you can use the latest BIOS (sp1992) which allows for drives up ...


1

You may have some luck by selecting option 2 in Clonezilla: "Use the same CPU level with that of this DRBL server." Source


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