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24

Summary: Real ISA Sound Blaster cards don't need any drivers to initialise or support them. Later PNP Sound Blasters (SB16/AWE) and clones may need a driver that performs one-time initialisation. Exotic cards may need memory-resident translation layers. Games use a collection of per-card drivers to talk to the appropriate hardware interface of the sound ...


16

Most PCI soundcards do not have hardware support for games and other applications that expect a SoundBlaster or AdLib to be present. Older cards made a special effort to provide what's known as "register level compatibility", so they could be used with a wide range of existing games. By the time PCI arrived, Windows had become the PC operating ...


8

The typical way to provide "driver" services to other programs in DOS is to run a TSR (Terminate and Stay Resident) program installing a software interrupt vector such that running DOS programs could invoke this INT for services (see Ralph Brown's Interrupt List). In the sound context, however, programs would typically do the device I/O directly by ...


4

Like any hardware, the hardware of a sound card needs to be “prepared for operation” after having powered up in an unconfigured state. Usually this consists of writing certain values to certain hardware ports and/or memory addresses (after testing for the presence of said sound card). After this, the sound card is ready for operation. In Windows or any other ...


4

I want to expand a little bit on SciTech Display Doctor (SDD). Versions 5.3a and 6.53 support Windows 3.1x through Windows 95 (version 6.53 can be installed in Windows 98, but VESA driver is unusable). Version 7.0a supports Windows 95 and Windows 98. Despite SDD claims to support Windows 3.1x, the only Windows-specific thing it installs is some wconfig.exe ...


3

VOGONS has a library of old DOS and early Windows drivers. They have the drivers for the CT6080. I can't tell if this is compatible or not. Also oldskool.org has an FTP repository that includes Video Blaster drivers (no model# I can see)


1

You can download them from the MCbx Old Computer Collection, for Windows 9x; scroll to the bottom of the page.


1

I get a feeling it's not going to work. The VIA 8237 had AC'97 audio, but the 8237A has HD Audio (the successor standard to AC'97, which was published in 2004). To the best of my knowledge, there are no HD Audio drivers of any kind for Win98. If VIA says they have a download available, there's a good chance that they're mistakenly routing you to the AC'97 ...


1

When the Sound Blaster was first introduced, the documented way to use the digitized audio features was to make use of a supplied blob of code which was supplied by Creative Labs. If memory serves, using this blob of code required reading it into RAM at a multiple-of-16 address, and invoke it with a normalized form of that address (offset zero of whatever ...


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