13

According to The Register’s history of the Electron, production had stopped before the Olivetti cash infusion; in February 1985: But the Electron, seen to be low on Olivetti’s list of priorities too, managed to hold on. “We will be continuing to sell the Electron this year and hopefully next year as well,” pledged Reid, still interim chief executive and, ...


12

It cost me something like $50 all up to connect my Electron to the TV using an RGB to SCART cable (this one from eBay) and an RGB to HDMI converter like the one pictured below: You can get this model from a bunch of different eBay sellers, under various different brand names, but they're all the same. I've tested it out with MODE 0 - MODE 6, and it seems ...


11

The Electron outputs an analogue interlaced 625-line image, with a line rate of 15.625Khz. HDMI is a digital input, so cannot comprehend the Electron's analogue output. VGA is analogue but many monitors expect a line rate of 31 kHz. It's not impossible that your screen would be okay with 15.625Khz though, as that's the PAL standard, so you could at least ...


10

Yes. The BBC has a Motorola 6845 generating its screen addresses. That's a flexible chip, with which the developer has wide control over screen sizing and placement. The Electron has a custom ULA designed by Acorn to produce the same video address generation as the 6845 when configured in one of the built-in modes but its functionality is fixed. So on a ...


9

Only very rarely because the tape hardware is completely distinct between the two machines, it’s very lightly documented and somewhat peculiar on the Electron, is fairly fixed in its functionality, the built-in routines are pretty good (including rewind and retry), and using the standard routines gives you a trivial pathway to adapting your title to ROM or ...


3

Sorry for being vague, but I believe of of the beeb racing games (may be revs) hides some code on screen in the sky area. A couple of timer interrupts to change the pallet was much easier than the practically unknown at the time "virtical rupture".


3

You might want to check this site out. It appears there are a bunch of utilities that help "clean" the sound, the fact that these exist probably mean that these UEF files are especially sensitive to signal/noise issues. http://www.retroisle.com/others/acornelectron/software.php


1

Get uefwalk from here or elsewhere. Then run: ./uefwalk --output=bitstream in.uef | ./kleen/bitclean -i -| aplay -f cd -c 1 Replace aplay with sox -t raw -c 1 -L -b 16 -e signed -r 44100 - -t wav out.wav if you want to save the output rather than play it. In my experience this has proved perfectly reliable at getting data into a BBC Micro. I ...


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