18

The Heathkit H11 was available either as a kit or pre-assembled. It never became really popular in the West, but it was one of the most powerful PCs available in 1978. It used the LSI-11 small format of the PDP-11, and came with 4 kwords of memory for $1295. (That is 8 kbytes, but DEC preferred to refer to memory as register size, which was 16 bits.) It ...


13

After pressing "AP2+CБP" key combination computer switches to extended memory mode, in which screen is reduced to 1/4 of original size giving about 12Kb memory of screen RAM to user (extending user RAM from 16K to 28K).


9

It's possibly a stretch, but the General Instruments CP1600 which was in the Intellivision, though otherwise unsuccessful, was based on the PDP-11 architecture. The Intellivision was a product of Mattel, not GI, so it's the one commercial machine that opted to use the chip rather than being the machine the chip was designed for. General Instruments designed ...


7

Well this certainly isn't exhaustive, but from what I can see the answer is no. I still find it fascinating that the Soviet basic school computer was a PDP-11 in a micro format. It makes me wonder what our systems of the era would have been like given a similar CPU. In any event, this is also a rather limiting factor. Porting MS BASIC from one 8-bit ...


7

There was Terak 8510/A - a graphic workstation with the LSI-11 compatible processor, a graphical frame buffer (hardware-scrollable the same way as in the BK-0010), and a text mode with downloadable fonts, although admittedly too expensive to be a home computer. In some sense BK-0010 looks like a stripped-down Terak (no text mode, less RAM, etc.), but the ...


6

From this page - It is in a section focused on BK0011, but symptoms are very similar: It really had 32KB RAM onboard but by pressing the 'Expanded memory' button you could send it to the mode when only 4 lines of text were displayed on a screen, and saved video RAM was added to available memory. I guess it could have the same reason (memory allocation ...


6

Definitely not. Vilnius Basic was created specifically for the 16bit K1801BMx chip family, and by and large was a port of MSX Basic for this CPU. Porting it to 8-bit machines was impractical due to widespread clones (or should I say adaptations, because they typically included extra functionality such as graphics or music) of MS Basic 3.2.


4

There were one-chip versions both of the PDP-8/LSI-8 (the models are called DECmate, using the Intersil/Harris 6100 chip) and the PDP-11/LSI-11 (J-11 or "Jaws" chip, used in a range of PDP-11 models). Also, these were hardly "home computers" due to their price point. They would be typically be bought by labs or research institutions, both in academia and ...


1

Back in to 80's DEC themselves had the PDT 150 which was an office version of our Lab PDP11/03's http://www.computerhistory.org/collections/catalog/102681914 It could have been used as a home computer as its smaller than some current PC Cube cases and I believe DEC sold some to employees


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