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1

You seen to be confusing the concept of "works" and "supports". "Supported" generally means that the vendor is willing to address any problems that arise. Code I write may appear to "work" in certain situations, but that doesn't mean I must "support" those situations - generally because I lack the capacity to ...


10

You're asking us to speculate about something that hasn't been released yet. However, looking at the FAQ, it's clear that this is just a fancy Linux box with some emulators on it. Processor: Intel Coffee Lake S Series Processor Memory: 2GB DDR4 RAM Polymega’s Modules use top tier emulators with low latency controller inputs. Emulators: Legally licensed ...


4

I can't speak as to why 'they' specifically think it's the case - the most straightforward answer is that they're making a joke, but I can tell you that bad dumps resulting in visual artifacts is very plausible. It doesn't even have to be a bad dump: The Amiga game Pinkie is spread across three disks, with five worlds you can play in any order. The graphics ...


15

You've answered your own question: this is a thankless and massive undertaking they of course can never make any money from it it's very illegal to make these available, which also puts them in serious danger of getting personally sued and having to pay money to Nintendo or others (this depends on the reader's jurisdiction, but it's a safe assumption) I'd ...


4

The emulator B7094 come with Fortran 2 and Fortran 4. It's relatively easy to use (much easier than hercules, of course) : https://www.majorgeeks.com/files/details/b7094_ibm_7094_emulator.html Fortran 4 is very similar to the "still in use" Fortran 77 and any incompatibility can be easily patched. I don't remember if it's shipped with the emulator, ...


2

MAME emulates a fixed, finite (if rather large) list of arcade games. The complete circuit board layout of every game is stored in the MAME executable. All code and data needed for emulation of most of the chips is compiled into the MAME executable, but for practical reasons, the contents of ROM chips are stored in external files. This is partly to keep the ...


13

When MAME started, the aim was to make the classic games work on a "modern" machine. For that, a lot of shortcuts were taken: hardcoding some game data / hardware color palette in the code giving names to EEPROMS that weren't the most logical sometimes the emulator used the Yamaha YM chip from the popular Sounblaster / AWE64 to play the sounds of ...


1

It is of course possible; the N64 was designed well into the era when computers were used for chip design and would produce an electronic description of how to print chips — analogous to a netlist for an FPGA but not exactly that. Those can be simulated in software. Given that you have unlimited funds, you can likely reverse-engineer those descriptions by ...


5

There's nothing magical about the N-64 that would make it impossible to emulate. If you had an unlimited budget, you could presumably just buy all of the intellectual property involved and possibly hire some people who worked on the original hardware if they are still available, so you wouldn't have to reverse engineer it all. I don't know why you've got ...


2

MAME already emulates various hardware, so I'd say the job is already 99.9%. https://www.reddit.com/r/emulation/comments/6lkqy7/mame_n64_emulation_results/ So - just gonna take a bit of time to squeeze the processing cycles from current hardware (CPU / GPU) My answer would be yes, if you had some super-smart dudes who knew what they were doing with the ...


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