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4

Just ran on the same issue and the answers above did not help so my 5 cents... So far it seems to me that the easiest way to deal with it is to use a simple script like this: #!/bin/bash [ ! -f "$1" ] && { echo "usage: $0 filename.txt" ; exit 1; } tr A-Z a-z < "$1" | petcat -w -2 -o "$1.prg" -- so basically ...


1

After some serious debugging I was able to pinpoint the problem to IP header checksum. I had hardware acceleration turned on for the checksum header calculation. Because of this the IP packets were created with a 0x0000 checksum. WarpCopy64 was ignoring all the correct messages because of this. I was able to remedy the issue by turning of IPv4 Checksum ...


4

Using VICE 3.4 on Linux, I am able to activate the Ethernet cartridge peripheral in the emulator and launch the WarpCopy64 server. To fully test, I'd just need a Windows machine on my LAN to run the client, but it ought to work fine. NOTE: One likely "gotcha" in getting communications working between the client and the server is the way VICE ...


4

WarpCopy64 uses the RR-Net cartridge, which is emulated in VICE 2.2 and up. Detailed set-up instructions can be found here, which should be a starting point. Except: I just tried it, an on my WinVICE 3.2 installation, the device dropdown remains empty. So you might have to try different versions of VICE.


1

One thing that can give emulators away (not reliably, but it might be good enough in practice) is how undefined the results are when you do something that is supposed to yield an undefined result. One thing that comes to mind is what you read from a bus when there is actually nothing writing to it, or using hardware in a way that is known to cause glitches ...


11

Wouldn't it defy the purpose of an emulator, designed to mimic a machine as perfect as possible, if it can be detected? In general, every detectable difference must be considered a bug one would expect to be removed ASAP. Some programs notice if they are run on a real C64 or an emulator. It would be great if you could add some examples. Especially with ...


23

In general, no there is no reliable way to detect an emulator (if it's any good). Especially if it's actively developed. The trick that worked yesterday probably don't tomorrow as emulation improves. Also, exploiting margins like ghost signals on floating bus lines may just lead to false positives as well, as there were quite a few differences between C64 ...


2

I don't know of any online resources that will teach you how to handle emulation of I/O devices, aside from looking at the source code of emulators that do this. There aren't any hard and fast rules about how an emulated I/O device should be mapped to 'real' I/O -- just do it however it's convenient for you and your users. Some mappings are natural, such ...


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