23

There is no limit, at least not by definition. And more so, not something across all terminals ever made. Most prominent nowadays (*1) is the so-called ANSI sequences standard - understood by next to all terminals built after ~1978. Trying to be as device agnostic as possible, it implies no upper limits by itself. The structure is built (*2) around an ...


8

This post appears to contain original .ASM source code for a VT52.SYS (but it may not be the same VT52.SYS you've seen references to). You would need an assembler (like MASM) to assemble it: https://web.archive.org/web/20190624115445/http://www.delorie.com/opendos//archives/browse.cgi?p=opendos/2003/12/04/09:58:08


8

It's one single source, not multiple vendors. Nearly all of what you mention actually comes from one source, DEC VTs. The various different control sequences generated by the function, cursor, editing, and calculator keypads that you mention pretty much all, with a couple of exceptions, have their roots in DEC VTs. A DEC VT had a slightly different (...


8

Tektronix (and emulated Tektronix) graphics mode Not exactly what you are looking for (because not "characters"), but Tektronix 4010/4014 mode as supported by Wyse 99GT and Wyse 370 (and I assume by actual Tektronix terminals, though I haven't used those since ~ 1986), supported Escape Codes for positioning on a 4,096 x 4,096 virtual display. ...


7

Partial answer: General notes: ESC [ is "control sequence introducer", CSI. ESC O is "single-shift-3", SS3. DEC VT200 terminals sent CSI n~ for function keys F6 onwards, where n = the F-key number plus 11 decimal. F1 to F5 were local only, but it is a reasonable extension to have them send similar sequences with n = 12 to 16. n = 11 to 15 seems like an ...


6

Well, as usual with complex matter the answer is a mixture of Yes/If. First of all, are these assumptions correct? Yes, the assumptions stated are perfect good and correct. In general. In detail there can be diversions, most depending on line characteristics (like blocking and error correcting modems), and ways the computer/its OS is designed. Now, my ...


5

The VT52 terminal escape codes should work fine within VT100 or VT220 Emulation. Later generations are able to support earlier codes. VT240 is the first terminal to support color displays as color for instance. This is VT color not ANSI. You should be able to run something like Putty on a windows computer and then attach to your device over the serial port. ...


4

I found a copy at PCJS.org, inside an OS/2 development boot floppy: http://www.pcjs.org/disks/pcx86/os2/misc/football/87058/


4

In the early 1980s practically every terminal had its own particular set of escape codes, to the point where the software we were selling then had a separate module which we could quickly reprogram as each customer sent us a copy of their terminal's manual. This continues at least as far as 1984. Some "grown-up" terminals did indeed use escape sequences ...


3

True terminals used to vary a lot in the code sequences they accepted for their control and code sequences they returned when a key was pressed. And keyboards were less standardized than nowadays, so the keys available used also to vary a lot. Programs and libraries (the best known is probably curses) which had to interact with several kinds of terminals ...


2

Short answer is yes. https://www.pcjs.org/devices/pc8080/machine/vt100/ has a vt100 emulator. Once you've selected the "emulator" screen press: F9 - Enter setup 4 - Toggle local/online to local (check the "LED" at the top) F9 - Leave setup to change into local echo mode, then type away....


2

Downloading VT52.SYS from a virtual machine on pcjs.org requires a few steps that may not be obvious if you're unfamiliar with the website: Go to a PCjs virtual machine (like the one that @john_e already posted) Make sure the desired disk, "OS/2 FOOTBALL (v7.68.17)", is loaded in drive A: Click the Save button Click OK on the "Check your Downloads folder ...


1

Originally, the escape character was used to initiate multi-character sequences when it was necessary to support more functions than could be accommodated in 31 active control characters (codes 0x00 and 0x7F were reserved as padding characters that would be ignored). Because some usages would require transmitting that character a lot, a key for transmitting ...


1

MS-DOS Kermit had a terminal emulator built in. It should be VT100 compatible, and thus VT52 backward compatible. I don't know if Kermit was based on a driver or whether terminal emulation was part of the app. You might be able to download MS-DOS Kermit and check it out.


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