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Plain DOS executables, in either COM or MZ format, don’t provide this information in their headers (when there is one — COM format doesn’t have a header). The only reliable way to determine whether a program requires a given CPU is to try running it on some less capable system (or emulation, e.g. with PCem which has accurate emulations of different x86 ...


16

There is no easy way. The original DOS "MZ" type executable header do not contain such information about what kind of code it contains or what CPU type it needs. It just contains a binary image that is loaded to memory and information about how to start it in real mode, so there are no separate 16-bit or 32-bit binaries. The binary image may ...


8

Is there some simple method for determining if a DOS binary (.exe or .dll) is 16-bit or 32-bit? For one, DOS doesn't know about 32 bit, it's a strict 16 bit system. Second, .DLL are not DOS executables but Windows libraries. The Linux file command just says "executable". Because all EXE start out as 16 bit programs, marked by the magic number &...


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