85

Because it's not important to ... anything. The compilers don't care. The editors don't care. Back in the day, some operating systems didn't even HAVE "file extensions". DOS mandated them, DEC system mandated them. Unix didn't. What's the standard extension for Fortran? For Pascal? For BASIC? Lots of convention, many system specific. But no ...


48

Plain DOS executables, in either COM or MZ format, don’t provide this information in their headers (when there is one — COM format doesn’t have a header). The only reliable way to determine whether a program requires a given CPU is to try running it on some less capable system (or emulation, e.g. with PCem which has accurate emulations of different x86 ...


33

The first edition of Stroustrup's "The C++ Programming Language" (1986) consistently uses a ".h" extension for C++ header files and ".c" for C++ source files. C and C++ source files were distinguished by which compiler you used, cc for C and CC for C++. The second edition (1991) uses the same convention, but mentions other ...


18

I wonder why Dr. Stroustrup chose not to be specific about this issue himself? You'll have to ask him. But based on what I've read from his website, he seems not to be strongly opinionated on stylistic matters like how to name files, where to put braces, or whether multi-word identifiers are written like_this or likeThis or LikeThis. His main concerns are ...


17

There is no easy way. The original DOS "MZ" type executable header do not contain such information about what kind of code it contains or what CPU type it needs. It just contains a binary image that is loaded to memory and information about how to start it in real mode, so there are no separate 16-bit or 32-bit binaries. The binary image may ...


9

Is there some simple method for determining if a DOS binary (.exe or .dll) is 16-bit or 32-bit? For one, DOS doesn't know about 32 bit, it's a strict 16 bit system. Second, .DLL are not DOS executables but Windows libraries. The Linux file command just says "executable". Because all EXE start out as 16 bit programs, marked by the magic number &...


8

One important historic reason is that many old computer architectures didn't have the concept of filename extensions. For example the Tandem computers I worked with in the late 1990s had for their entire file system just the following: computer/drive/directory/filename That was it, no subdirectories, no filename extensions, and every name limited to 8 ...


7

The info files fore the downloads (can be downloaded separately) show that there are two different versions of the game (1.0 and 1.4) plus two revisions of each version (1.0 with an alternative disk 1 and 1.4 with disk 1 and two having differences) Not uncommon with old games that they released several versions and never told you about it. The 'revisions' ...


6

I played around a bit with it, and it seems the solution is to basically emulate the full UART behaviour, in particular in regards to detecting start bits. Instead of framing statically by 10 bits, we need to walk the bits until we find a high -> low transition (the start bit), and then we take the next 9 bits as the 8 data bits (lsb first) and a high ...


5

The best way (and easiest, if you find the installer) to access nsf files is to install Lotus Notes client. It's a great file format, database like, capable of storing any kind of data (mail is just a part of Notes/Domino). I've worked on it up until v7 for a company I used to work for back then. It's really straight forward, you install Notes app and just ...


4

Not really familiar with this topic, but maybe you have checked libnsfdb project on GitHub to see if it already does what you need. It seems to have a tool for exporting the data out of the box.


3

FLTK for DOS - Apps - XFDOS distro: https://sourceforge.net/projects/fltk-dos/files/Applications/Binary%20versions%20of%20FLTK%20applications/ Here you will find mupdf.zip which has been working very well for me over the last hour since I downloaded it. Acrodos is useless except for viewing the pdfs it came with. You will need cwsdpmi.exe in the same ...


1

For reference, I am posting the .txt and .ini files from the exetype program. ********************************************************************* EXETYPE 1.0 is a tool to determine the nature of an executable file. Syntax: EXETYPE <filename> NOTE: EXETYPE does not yet support file wildcards. It is necessary to have the EXETYPE.INI file ...


1

Even within "16-bit mode", various 8086-compatible processors that have appeared over the years have extended the 8086 instruction set with instructions that weren't supported by earlier processors. Programs that only need to run on the later processors may exploit such instructions to perform various tasks more easily and efficiently than would ...


1

There is in the windows nt resource kit, a program called 'exetype'. The 3.1 version is a DOS program, while liter ones, like 3.51, is a win32 program. You type exetype filename.ext to get its type. It even tells you whether it's a vio (command line), or PM program.


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