30

Most large files (over 64KiB) with a .COM extension are really MZ executables; the DOS loader doesn’t care whether the extension is .EXE or .COM, it uses the MZ signature to identify the format. This is the only documented way for a .COM file larger than 64KiB to work, so it’s the only approach which can be relied upon. However it is possible to build a ....


15

I discovered the answer on my own. Turns out PSVIEW requires GhostScript, PDFTOPS, and LXPIC to be installed on the hard drive in order to run. GhostScript must be placed in 'C:\gs'. PDFTOPS and LXPIC must be in a directory mentioned in the path environment variable set in 'AUTOEXEC.BAT'.


12

The V1 Unix B manpage uses .s as the extension for intermediate assembly files used during the build. This is the earliest use of .s that I can find, and would correspond to November 1971 at the latest. There were assemblers on systems with file systems before Unix, but none that I’m aware of used .s. Some like DECsys don’t appear to have extensions; other ...


12

These are OMF libraries; you can analyse them with Agner Fog’s object file converter. It probably only makes sense to work with those libraries if you intend to build software with Microsoft C 5.1, in which case you’d use the tools provided with the compiler (LIB.EXE in particular). The OMF format is described in detail in OMF: Relocatable Object Module ...


11

The .z80 format comes from the Z80 emulator by Gerton Lunter. He released some documentation about the file formats used in it, and regarding offsets 11 and 12, this is what the manual says: .Z80 FILES: ----------- The old .Z80 snapshot format (for version 1.45 and below) looks like this: Offset Length Description 0 1 A register ...


11

About the R register on a real Z80: But is the 8th bit actually used? Yes, it's freely available and won't be touched by any instruction except loading R Is its behaviour undocumented or can it only be altered by loading it with a value from the accumulator It's well documented and can be used like assumed. When loaded all 8 bits from A are stored in R - ...


9

You can't tell if a .do/.po disk image file is in DOS order or ProDOS order unless you recognize something on the disk. If it has a DOS 3.3 or ProDOS filesystem, it's pretty easy. Otherwise... not so easy. If you want to see how CiderPress does it, take a look at the AnalyzeImageFile function here. After peeling off .gz/.zip, it checks the file extension....


8

A partly speculative answer, working backwards from the source code of Marat Fayzulin's ColEm, it appears to be a fixed-size sector dump. On line 52 of EMULib/FDIDisk.c you can see confirmation of the geometry you already know about: single sided; 40 tracks; 8 sectors per track; 512-byte sectors. Line 406 lists FMT_ADMDSK (i.e. Adam disk) amongst those ...


7

What is the name of this file format, Well, it's called Intel-Hex-Format :)) Or are you asking about the file the link points to (tinybasic-2.0.hex) ? That's no file format. It's simply the recording of a (terminal) output (*1) while one has first dumped the symbol list followed by the the Intel-Hex file. and what modern tools can I use to convert it into ...


6

The original Spectrum +3 manual has a comprehensive description of the disk format: http://www.worldofspectrum.org/ZXSpectrum128+3Manual/chapter8pt27.html For TR-DOS, it's worth knowing that the .TRD file format is a simple sector-by-sector dump of the disk contents with no additional headers, so any description of the .TRD format (such as this one on zx-...


6

The Jacquard loom predates the computer by a long time. As such, the distinction is a bit like asking whether or not a horse runs on diesel or petrol; whatever distinction you're trying to make by applying terminology from a different technology isn't likely to be useful or meaningful. The distinction between code and data is mostly a relic of Von Neumann ...


6

I support DMK in my MSX emulator, and bear in mind that it's a bit of a confused file format. It has a bunch of design deficiencies, and was clearly tightly coupled to the program that originally implemented it. But starting with the perfectly sensible stuff: The first 16 bytes are the header, which you seem to be familiar with — write protection, geometry, ...


4

https://fileinfo.com/extension/zdb says File Type 2 EPSQ Database with description: Encrypted file format used by the U.S. military and Department of Defense for Electronic Personal Security Questionnaire (EPSQ) documents; most often used for the Standard Form (SF) 86 Questionnaire, which is used by military personnel, government employees, and ...


4

Look carefully at the docs again (Web Archive one). "The file bodies are stored after the directory entries. Basic program and data array files have an addition at the end of the file." If it is basic program, there are 4 bytes: 2 fixed values 127,170 and autostart line number 0.. 9999. If it is data array, there are also 4 bytes: 2 fixed values 127,170, 1 ...


3

You can look at the file systems: Here are descriptions of the DOS file system and the ProDOS file system. They are quite different, so you attempt to list the files on the disk, usually one approach will produce garbage, and one won't. That's pretty obvious to a human, but less obvious to a program. Also keep in mind that there are .dsk images (in ...


3

/CMD files are a series of tagged records. Some record types have meaning only for certain features of some of the TRS-80 DOSes. Only two seem important for loading and executing them. byte: type byte: size* in bytes bytes[size]: data *size 0 → 256 bytes *size for type 1 only, size 1 → 257 bytes, size 2 → 258 bytes type 1: object code (...


3

The best resource is a book called TRS80 Disk and other mysteries. I found a copy online at: https://ia801709.us.archive.org/28/items/TRS-80_Disk_and_Other_Mysteries_1980_Harvard_C._Pennington/TRS-80_Disk_and_Other_Mysteries_1980_Harvard_C._Pennington_text.pdf My real copy is old and under a bunch of dust, but it does have the complete disk mapping ...


3

Others here have mentioned the inter-sector gaps, but I thought it might be enlightening to describe just how much space these really take; it's probably more than you might think. Today I happened to be working out code to format disks on my Fujitsu FM-7, which uses 5.25" double-sided, double-density floppies, just like the IBM PC, with the same low-level (...


2

Intro I already added an answer, but this time I want to expand on the idea more forcefully. First, let me say that I think this question perhaps better belongs on CS. It's more about philosophy and theory than it is about the Jaquard Loom, per se. Even so, let's run with it and see how far we get. New Claim We all agree that a given bit string might ...


2

Program code is a specific type of data. So the question is really: What is it that distinguishes code data from other forms of data?. Non-code data is a representation of state. Code data is a representation of a process for manipulating data. Data states remain stable until they are acted upon over time according to the instructions in the code data. ...


2

The Disk Masher System entry on the Archive Team wiki suggests the following tools: xDMS (Public Domain, portable C source) dms111 (Original Amiga software) Ancient Format Decompressor (decompresses to ADF) The linked xDMS page claims... Supports decompression of files compressed using all known DMS compression modes, including old ...


2

A long time ago there was an official release of Acroreader for DOS. I assume it would work with FreeDOS, but I don't know. I also don't know where you might find a copy, but if you search it is probably still out there.


2

Looks like Acrobat Reader 3.0 might be the latest version of Acrobat Reader that will work under Windows 3.11, which you can install in a DOS environment. If you have enough disk space, and are willing to replace FreeDOS with an actual MS-DOS 6.22 install, you can try installing Windows 3.x and use that to read PDFs when needed.


1

Simply use any text editor to remove everything but the HEX lines (started by a colon character ":"). This is how to get a pure HEX file. Colon has to be the very first character on each row, so remove the leading spaces too. Step 2 - use e.g. ASM80 Tools for HEX to BIN conversion to convert it to binary image.


1

TR-DOS Files themselves have no header at all. Metadata is stored in the directory section of the disk, along with the filename. The metadata has a type field, which is also the file extension. Depending on this field you interpret some of the other fields in different ways. "B" for Basic programs. "C" for machine code, or any binary file ...


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