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1

For reference, I am posting the .txt and .ini files from the exetype program. ********************************************************************* EXETYPE 1.0 is a tool to determine the nature of an executable file. Syntax: EXETYPE <filename> NOTE: EXETYPE does not yet support file wildcards. It is necessary to have the EXETYPE.INI file ...


1

Even within "16-bit mode", various 8086-compatible processors that have appeared over the years have extended the 8086 instruction set with instructions that weren't supported by earlier processors. Programs that only need to run on the later processors may exploit such instructions to perform various tasks more easily and efficiently than would ...


1

There is in the windows nt resource kit, a program called 'exetype'. The 3.1 version is a DOS program, while liter ones, like 3.51, is a win32 program. You type exetype filename.ext to get its type. It even tells you whether it's a vio (command line), or PM program.


9

One important historic reason is that many old computer architectures didn't have the concept of filename extensions. For example the Tandem computers I worked with in the late 1990s had for their entire file system just the following: computer/drive/directory/filename That was it, no subdirectories, no filename extensions, and every name limited to 8 ...


-7

Linux does not need extensions. The type of file is stored in file metadata (Linux system). And the extension is used for the OS desktop to open file in a specific tool only. Like if your file is .docx, it will be opened in Microsoft Office or LibreOffice.


32

The first edition of Stroustrup's "The C++ Programming Language" (1986) consistently uses a ".h" extension for C++ header files and ".c" for C++ source files. C and C++ source files were distinguished by which compiler you used, cc for C and CC for C++. The second edition (1991) uses the same convention, but mentions other ...


18

I wonder why Dr. Stroustrup chose not to be specific about this issue himself? You'll have to ask him. But based on what I've read from his website, he seems not to be strongly opinionated on stylistic matters like how to name files, where to put braces, or whether multi-word identifiers are written like_this or likeThis or LikeThis. His main concerns are ...


85

Because it's not important to ... anything. The compilers don't care. The editors don't care. Back in the day, some operating systems didn't even HAVE "file extensions". DOS mandated them, DEC system mandated them. Unix didn't. What's the standard extension for Fortran? For Pascal? For BASIC? Lots of convention, many system specific. But no ...


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