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0

Linux systems can support a lot of hardware floppy formats (maybe not ALL that these old tools offered), that is what the various fd* (eg fd0h1722) devices in a classical /dev filesystem are meant for. See the fd(4) manual page. If the format you use is supported, you will be able to simply mount the appropriate device as the appropriate filesystem (vfat, ...


16

In my experience, your best bet to read 2M/2MGUI disks is to find an old PC with a built-in floppy controller, and run either DOS (with 2M and 2MGUI) or Linux (with Mtools, which supports 2M formats) to try to read the disks. Even then, some 2M disks will be hard to read — beyond the usual problems with old floppy disks, since 2M formats really push the ...


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I'm not sure if this is technically possible for the disk format you are asking about, but there is an open source project by David Given called FluxEngine that has been trying to read all kinds of weird and exotic disk formats by reading the magnetic flux changes directly - creating a sort of 'disk image' that can then be deciphered in software to ...


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There is any way today to recover/dump to a file these disks with modern elements? specially the 5"1/4 ones... Only by using the same drive/controller combination with the 2M Software. Especially the controller is important, as the software bypasses regular format to increase density, which may not be possible with newer hardware. I've both kind of ...


3

This will work with the USB floppy drive you have mentioned, a Chuanganzhuo one, using Windows 10. You have to use a proper Double Density floppy disk, not a High Density one. I tried it with a High Density floppy disk and it gave me Parameters not supported by drive. C:\Users\J>format a: /T:80 /N:9 Insert new disk for drive A: and press ENTER when ...


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