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2

Looks like it uses WD1770 I am not familiar with it but first check if WD1770 is compatible with IBM format. If yes then you can read the discs directly on PC ... If not you need HW capable of reading the disc. So in case of PC compatible you just image it using direct sector access in C++ (or any other language or utility) instead of file format. After you ...


3

I couldn't find technical information or an existing emulator but via your links I found this high-resolution image of the interface's board. From there I notice the following things: the disk controller is a WD1770, that's the big one on the left; the two large chips on the right both half underneath the edge connector are an 8kb RAM and an EPROM; and ...


4

The Disk-II mechanism is essentially a floppy drive with the low-level controller ripped out. Few, if any, other manufacturers were willing to do that, as it means a more complex controller and connection to the computer. Drive mechanisms from the Shugart SA-400 onwards used just two lines — Direction and Step — to manage the heads. To manage the four ...


0

There used to be games that used half tracks, and I believe, quarter tracks for copyright protection. Skipping half tracks in the middle was fairly common, there were special copy programs that could copy those disks but they where unreliable and took forever. If a normal floppy was written as 1 3 5 7 9 half track such a disk would be written as 1 3 6 8 10 ...


0

The click is caused by the drive head hitting the backstop that prevents it stepping beyond the location of track 1. The Amiga floppy controller can only detect when there is a disk inserted when stepping the drive head, so the trackdisk.device that operates it periodically steps the head against the backstop, causing the clicking sound. Revision 33.7 of ...


5

On the Amiga, CIA 1 is used for the disk controller, and Port A on CIA 1 is used to sense the state of the /DSKCHANGE signal from a pin on the floppy drive interface of the currently selected unit (Amigas support up to 4 daisy-chained floppy drives). The /DSKCHANGE signal is latched in the active (low) state when a disk is removed, and Amiga floppy drives ...


3

The floppy drives have a "disk inserted" sensor and signal wire. When a disk is removed, the signal changes immediately. But when a disk is inserted, the signal does not change automatically, but only when the disk head is moved. Amiga handles this by stepping the drive head of empty drives every couple of seconds - if a disk has been inserted, the ...


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