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34

Try THE OLDSCHOOL PC FONT RESOURCE Looks positively awesome to me. I started by looking for IBM MDA - the classic 9x14 font, and I found this site. License is Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0. I've downloaded the file. Zip contains all the fonts ready to install in Windows. You should be able to convert it to whatever you need, including actual ...


25

-misc-fixed-* X11 font "family" matches all your criteria - it originated sometime in the 1980s, thus it can be considered retro or vintage, is distributed public domain, comes in several sizes (5x7 seems appropriate for a small LCD display), it is still developped and as a consequence has a reasonable beyond-Latin1 repertoire, the BDF (or PCF) format is ...


22

Why did the original Apple //e have two sets of inverse uppercase characters? Simple: To allow lower case inverse letters. It's all about the clever way Woz arranged the original II's single character set to save in hardware and offer additional functionality. There is only a single character set of 64 characters, showing up 4 times in 256 entry character ...


20

Digital Research produced as one of their early attempts into graphical desktops (on their way to GEM) a basic portable graphics library - GSX. GSX did actually support proportional fonts, both in print and on-screen, and was included with the CP/M support in Amstrad machines running CP/M Plus. GSX was supported by two of DR's own applications, DR Draw and ...


17

Are there vintage or historical bitmapped fonts available for non-commercial use? I'm looking for a source for one or a few 1-bit black-or-white bitmapped fonts used in the past, available in a set of sizes. Typefaces are not subject to copyright, at least in the US, so you can do what you want (again, in the US). Bitmapped representations are ...


14

Just the first (of many) example of using proportional fonts on Commodore64: https://youtu.be/k2NRlsopoOU?t=441 You couldn't really use a proportional font on the Spectrum because the colour attributes were one background and one foreground for each 8x8 square. That meant that, practically speaking, each letter had to be by itself in an 8x8 cell. ...


12

Damien Guard's series of articles starting with Typography in 8 bits: System fonts has versions of almost all of the old system fonts you might remember. If you don't mind digging about in ROM images, there are rather more than one lifetime's worth here: https://github.com/phooky/PROM — the Osbourne 1 font is remarkably pretty. For making true bitmaps from ...


11

Check out this page https://classictech.wordpress.com/computer-companies/acer-groupmultitech-electronics-inc-sunnyvale-calif/ Esp. the PDF at the end of the article, dated September 14th 1982: https://classictech.files.wordpress.com/2010/03/1982-multitech-presskit-introduces-first-microcomputer-to-handle-chinese-9-14-82.pdf It says: The MPF-II-C takes ...


10

No 8-bit computer (back then) did support proportional fonts out of the box, but there where some programs on next every bitmap capable 8 bit computer, I this might as well include the Spectrum. For the Apple II support was added by Apple rather early. Already the Apple DOS Toolkit included a utility called HRCG or High Resolution Character Generator, ...


10

Back in 1986, a company called Berkeley Softworks released a GUI desktop environment called GEOS for the Commodore 64. It was later ported to the Commodore 128, the Commodore Plus/4, and Apple II. GEOS was obviously inspired by the classic Mac OS desktop. It implements all the basic elements one would expect from such environment, such as a pointer-driven ...


7

The games Skool Daze and Back To Skool used proportional fonts for text on the ZX Spectrum. (source: worldofspectrum.org)


7

This is Morozov’s screen driver, available e.g. from SimtelNet archives. It uses a fairly typical font format for EGA/VGA fonts, namely a dump of the in-memory font data as loaded for the character generator in an EGA or VGA graphics adapter: 256 characters each formed of 8 to 16 bytes (depending on the number of lines in the font), each byte encoding a line ...


5

I suspect that what you're dealing with here is two different file formats that happen to use the same filename extension, of ".fnt". There has never been any mechanism to control the use of filename extensions on DOS or Windows, except for market pressure, and .fnt is a very obvious choice for fonts. Windows .fnt is pretty much obsolete, but it could ...


5

The screen character set on the Apple II looks like this: 00-1f: ASCII 40-5f, but inverse text 20-3f: ASCII 20-3f, but inverse text 40-5f: ASCII 40-5f, but flashing text 60-7f: ASCII 20-3f, but flashing text 80-9f: ASCII 40-5f (officially control characters, but displayed as normal text) a0-bf: ASCII 20-3f c0-df: ASCII 40-5f e0-ff: ASCII 20-3f (Apple ][/][+)...


5

The bitmap fonts that come with http://x3270.bgp.nu/documentation-faq.html are licensed under the same MIT-like terms the program is under. Some of them are too large for your application, but there is one that's 8 pixels tall. If you download the source tarfile, it'll have the .bdf fonts inside it. You can probably just grab the Signetics characters that ...


5

The Amstrad CPC bitmap font is detailed in chapter 7 of the user manual. There is an 8x8 bitmap for each ASCII character.


4

The Wikipedia page on 'Chinese BASIC' (which cites the Multitech Microprofessor as the article's most prominent example) depicts a traditional Chinese keyboard of the time, showing only 113 Chinese symbols on offer, plus 68 you'd expect on an English keyboard. Even at 32 bytes per symbol (i.e. 14x16 pixels on an Apple II if there's no reprocessing in ...


1

Even if one is using a bitmap mode, a routine to draw tile-based graphics that are aligned with byte boundaries can be much faster than one which isn't thus restricted. Suppose one wants to draw an 8-pixel wide character at a location that is displaced by two pixels from an aligned position. Code to do that would end up having to look something like: loop:...


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