20

Firstly, the stretching isn't done in the vertical direction: Game Boy (and Color) games only used 144 rows of the 160 available on Advance screen, so there'd be black "letterbox" bars at the top and bottom, whether you stretched the image widescreen (with the shoulder buttons) or not. Horizontally, the image is definitely stretched. If the Advance had ...


13

Not Linux, but I know you can run UNIX 5 with a tool called gbaunix. You can read about the process in Amit Singh's paper on kernelthread and you can browse through the source on my unofficial fork on GitHub. You will need a a copy of the RK05 disk image to use gbaunix. If you don't want to recompile the binary, you can cat the disk image with the ...


13

The GBA's memory controller can be configured using WAITCNT, an MMIO port at 0x04000204, to use slow or fast timing when accessing the Game Pak slot. The BIOS boots up in slow mode, in case Nintendo would release games on slow ROM. But Nintendo ended up releasing all games on fast ROM, and when a game starts, it writes a value to WAITCNT to enable fast ...


12

None of the GameBoy series machine has a Z80, but instead a Sharp LR35902, which runs a "GBZ80" instruction set, which is if I'm not mistaking similar but incompatible with the genuine Z80, as it lacks the two registers sets (much like the 8080) and other instructions. Just like the 2A03 in the NES, the CPU is in the same chip as the sound generation ...


10

Linux itself will not run on the GBA SP. The reason for this is that the CPUs (one ARM7TDMI and one Z80) do not have a way to protect and manage memory. The component to do that is the MMU, which needs to be present on all computers that can run Linux. But a variant called uCLinux (short for microcontroller Linux) has some things stripped out and could ...


7

The Wikipedia comment is misleading. The Game Boy CPU has several components in one chip, including the Z80-alike CPU core and a sound generator among others. These components may all be in the same chip but they are functionally independent; you don't need the Z80 CPU to be able to produce audio. The Nintendo DS inherited the Game Boy sound generator ...


5

I developed few game on the GBA back in the days and I remember that I looked into using the Z80 but found nothing in the official documentation. Even if possible, it is an unsupported feature and therefore I doubt that any Nintendo approved game uses it.


5

I would say no. I've never heard of anything like that ever. That would require dumping all of the memory of the actual Gameboy and the state of CPU, and then reading that information on startup. Highly unlikely anyone ever made anything like that as a device addon.


4

It depends on how the game (or the program, if not running a game) is programmed. It does not depend on the system, but on where the memory where program is executed is physically located. If a program is loaded in RAM that stays inside the system and uses RAM which is inside the system, it won't freeze when removing the cartridge. On the other hand, if the ...


4

Thanks to this Slashdot article, I also found a guide from 2004 with instructions on how to port Microcontroller Linux (uClinux) to the GBA. The main site is long dead, but I found a mirror via the WayBack Machine. The uClinux cvs repo is long dead, but if you can find the September 9th, 2003 snapshot (uClinux-dist-20030909.tar.gz), you should be able to ...


2

I don't know if this applies to this card in particular, but in all likelihood, one of the things the patch program does is to patch in custom save game functionality so that the ROMs can write to the flashcard rather than expecting their own flash memory to be present. Later cards were sophisticated enough to do this patching on-the-fly. I'd recommend if ...


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