37

The gameboy has a "normally white" LCD. If the pixels are uncharged, the display is bright. The more you charge the pixels, the darker they get. Interestingly, this effect works with either polarity of charging voltage (just like you can attract a piece of iron with either the south or the north pole of a magnet). To avoid possible destruction of ...


35

For Gameboy clocking 3 'generations' need to be seen All 'classic' Gameboy, that is the original all the way including micro run (the 8 bit CPU) from the same 4.194 MHz MHz crystal, divided by two, for a CPU clock of 2.097 MHz. Gameboy Color and later added a double speed mode, allowing the 8 bit CPU to run at 4.194 MHz Super Gameboy does as well run the ...


34

Game Boy games do not always need a manual save operation. There's no hardware reason that would prevent Game Boy games from saving in the way you describe. For the Game Boy hardware, RAM present on the cart can be used by games for whatever it needs. SRAM is RAM on the cartridge; most of the time, it's backed up by a battery and used to store save data, ...


32

Microprocessors have a minimum operating voltage spec, but that generally doesn't mark a threshold where they stop executing code. Instead, it specifies level below which they aren't guaranteed to execute instructions correctly. When a game is powered off, a processor may execute a few hundred or a few thousand instructions between the time the voltage ...


25

Neither. The level determines how fast the pieces drop. At level 9 a piece drops (assuming you don't press down) 1 row every 11 frames. So at the Gameboy's framerate of 59.73fps that means it drops at a speed of 1 row every 184ms. At level 10 it speeds up, dropping the piece every 10 frames. At level 20 it reaches a speed of 1 drop every 3 frames (50ms) and ...


18

I don't know if this is correct, but it seems to fit. The SNES sound chip is a full processor. It can run its own program and play sounds independently of the main processor. It is also possible for a Game Boy ROM to load a sound program into the SNES sound chip via the Super Game Boy. Animaniacs is one those games. While the way the SNES sound chip is ...


14

The first supertwist LCD displays had a definite blue color whose saturation varied with how hard the display was driven; some later ones use color compensation techniques to appear more grayish, but because the exact shade of blue is affected by how the displays are driven, such techniques aren't perfect. My father had a Macbook with a monochrome LCD which,...


11

LCD display segments (pixels) are electrodes that are used to control the electric field applied to the liquid crystals that are between the electrodes. So in essence they are tiny capacitors, and to turn the segment on, a voltage is applied to electrodes to charge an electric field which quickly aligns the crystals to polarize the light so that it gets ...


11

My question is, why did they use an LD B, B instruction, and not a proper NOP? LD B,B works like a NOP - at least as stated in the original 8080 manual (*1): The original 8080 had 8 NOPs at 00xxx000 but only the first was defined as 'the nop'. In addition there were 7 instructions of loading a register with itself (*2). Effective NOPs, but not defined as ...


8

The custom chips in the original consoles were built using NMOS logic. An NMOS (N-channel Metal Oxide Semiconductor) logic gate consists of one or more transistors called NFETs (N-channel Field Effect Transitor) which could pull a signal low when their inputs were high, along with a passive device that would pull a signal high when nothing was pulling it ...


8

Cost While the actual design work is already done, it is quite possible that much of the production-related equipment - e.g., molds for cases and controllers - is long gone. If so, that would all need to be built again, at significant cost. 100,000 may sound like a lot, but spreading costs of that equipment over 100,000 consoles is very different from ...


7

Well, there's a fifth one: A sequence issue not really considered relevant when first published. The underlaying issue is that sprites are not moved during scrolling the background, prior to (re)drawing the screen. While this is rather obvious with large sharp screens, it will be perceived less of an issue on original Game Boy hardware due the small screen ...


7

I'm not a specialist but what I read is that the battery-backed SRAM module is on the cartridge, not in the console itself. The technique you're describing is roughly the one used in emulators (known as "save states"). Emulators aren't aware of the game mechanics, they just dump the whole RAM + state of hardware registers in a file, and reload it ...


7

I think you've been unlucky in your browsing. All the sources I've ever seen say that the Super Game Boy is 2.4% faster than the Game Boy. The Game Boy's clock speed is 4.194304 MHz. The Super Game Boy divides the SNES's clock speed of 21.47727 MHz (for the NTSC console) by 5 to get 4.295454 MHz. Dividing the last number by the first gets you 1.02411603928, ...


4

I'd like to offer an additional reason, from the point of view of a game developer. Part of the requirements for a game to pass the submission/approval process was to limit the number of times the save data is written to. This is actually still in force to some degree on the Nintendo Switch. Flash memory can only handle a finite number of writes before it ...


4

Lacking meaningful research avenues, I started surveying YouTube videos, and I think I managed to mine some insights even from that scant evidence. Here is what I found out: The issue is apparently just barely visible, if at all, on the original Game Boy; it probably cannot be noticed on a real handheld unless one is specifically looking for it, as LCD ...


4

The Nintendo logo thing is a working and legal trademark security system. Sega messed up with their Trademark Security System, because it doesn't actually include the logo in the cart binary. Nintendo did it right. Any unlicensed cart that has that Nintendo logo bitmap in it is truly violating the trademark if the logo shows on the screen. But if the logo ...


3

The Spanish Wikipedia has a dedicated Gameboy Pocket article, giving a European release date of March 1997.


2

Putting aside my concern that this question perhaps isn't ideal for this site (on the basis that the limited close votes so far suggest that I might be wrong about that), this answer is community wiki because it's a bit vague and waffling, and adjustments might be useful. You can implement the UI side of things however you like. Personally I try to make the ...


1

To answer this with absolute certainty, you'd have to examine each cartridge on its own, particularly those that weren't made by Nintendo. I'm not sure anyone has ever done that, but people have looked at quite a number of cartriges (e.g., here and here), and Nintendo cartridges for the GB/GBC all appear to use the Mitsumi MM1134 system supervisor IC (or ...


1

It has been recently observed (in nesdev) that the Gameboy CPU appears equivalent to the SM83 CPU described in this PDF. (Both CPUs appear to have the same instruction set and the same interrupt vector locations - but are connected to different hardware and interrupts) Looking at the SM83-using hardware in the PDF (SM8311/SM8313/SM8314/SM8315) - it has: All ...


1

Do any other 8080-like CPUs provide this, or is this unique to the Sharp LR35902? The Sharp SM83 family (SM8311/83113/8314/8315) support the same instructions, documented in the Sharp Microcomputer Databook 1996 (page 186) as: MNEMONIC OPERATION LD A, (C) A ← (FF00ʜ + C) LD A, (n) A ← (FF00ʜ + n) LD (C), A (FF00ʜ + C) ← A LD (n), A (FF00ʜ + n) ← A


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